Journal of a Residence in Chili

Front Cover
Wells and Lilly, 1823 - Chile - 237 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 112 - ... thing that might be in their way, and shrieking " misericordia, misericordia." The shock continued but for an instant, and was lighter than one which was felt in Massachusetts a few days before we sailed, and •was the talk of a moment. I am told however, that I can form no idea of the effect of an earthquake in Chili, as the year past has been remarkably and providentially exempt from this calamity.
Page 112 - ... from the removal of the capital of the province to its present site, in consequence of the inundation and destruction of many of the houses of the old city, in the great earthquake, some eighty or ninety years ago. For the year past there has been but one very perceptible shock in the province of Concepcion. This was a few evenings since. Some eight or ten were at supper in the estancia, when suddenly they all started up, and rushed out of doors, overturning everything in their way, and shrieking...
Page 89 - ... of an hour or a day, but of weeks, and it makes no difference, in what numbers, they arrive at any friend's estancia ; thirty can be as conveniently accommodated, as three ; there is never a lack of provisions, and their beds, both rich and poor, they always take with them ; these consist of some eight or ten rugs, and pillions of skins, (sometimes beautifully coloured,) which form the furniture of their horses. Their saddles are of different construction from ours; or are rather only the frames...
Page 33 - The supplies brought by our two vessels,' says the author, ' have proved a most seasonable relief to the garrison here. The troops were miserably armed, and badly supplied in every respect. Our muskets were recognized upon their shoulders, the very day after they were taken from on board. A great part of the cargo also, which they have taken on appraisal, after their own manner, had already been converted into clothes for the soldiers, who were paid too with our money.
Page 46 - They are said to have greatly degenerated from the old Araucanian character, and the intercourse with the Spaniards to have been greatly •deleterious to them; and that they still preserve their territories, which are known to be richer in mines, and more fertile than any other parts of Chili, is owing, probably, to the weakness of the Spaniards than to any strength of their own. I have seen several bodies of them from twenty to sixty in number. Their general appearance is not very different from...
Page 101 - The following passages may serve to complete the picture of the establishments of the Chilian gentry. ' The estancia, in which I am, may be taken as a pretty fair sample of the better order of country houses, in this part of the country. The house is about eighty feet in length, by twenty five in breadth, with a broad corridor, and three quartos, as they are called, — little apartments attached to the house which serve for sleeping rooms. The walls are of sunburnt brick, three feet in thickness,...
Page 101 - ... houses, in this part of the country. The house is about eighty feet in length, by twenty five in breadth, with a broad corridor, and three quartos, as they are called, — little apartments attached to the house which serve for sleeping rooms. The walls are of sunburnt brick, three feet in thickness, plaistered within and without ; two large doors opposite each other, and one small window ; the roof thatched with reeds, and covered with takas, made of clay burned, in form semi-cylindrical, and...
Page 176 - Angeles, and to rich country gentlemen. A number of these last had already resorted to the city with their families ; and among them, many were easily distinguished as Europeans. The city is built upon the same plan as Concepcion ; the streets wide and at right angles, and the same style of architecture ; but the private houses not so well built, nor of so good materials, and the public buildings vastly inferior. ' On one side of the square is a large castle or fort, with a deep fosse and thick walls,...
Page 101 - ... they have little more to do than to scatter it upon the ground, in order to be insured an abundant increase. The estancia in which I am, may be taken as a pretty fair sample of the better order of country houses, in this part of the province. The house is about eighty feet in length by twenty-five in breadth, with a broad corridor, and three quartos, as they are called, little apartments attached to the house, which serve for sleeping rooms. The walls are of sun burnt brick, three feet in thickness,...
Page 88 - ... smooth stones, and many small ones, pelt each other, with these last, by the concussion of the former, and generally hit their aim with great certainty. This and the following two or three months, are likewise the season of diversion ; the farmers, planters and country gentlemen, are every where exchanging visits, not of an hour or a day, but of weeks, and it makes no difference, in what numbers, they arrive at any friend's estancia ; thirty can be as conveniently accommodated, as three ; there...

Bibliographic information