Australian Citizenship

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Melbourne Univ. Publishing, 2004 - Political Science - 260 pages
Such questions as What does it mean to be Australian? and How has Australian citizenship changed and developed over the past 100 years? are answered in this look at the inherent rights and obligations of Australian citizenship. The argument is made against the view that citizenship is an imagined construct as the significance of citizenship to the everyday life of Australians is revealed. From an examination of the Federation debates and the design of Australia's constitutional system to the shameful treatment of indigenous Australians and the second-tier status that women have often held, the text maps the complexity of being an Australian citizen. Current major issues facing citizenship are discussed, including national identity, the republic, multiculturalism, and human rights.
 

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Contents

Australian Citizenship
1
Institutional Framework
19
Migration
46
Multiculturalism
72
Land and Heritage
97
Nationalism and Patriotism
120
Civics and Everyday Life
140
Aborigines
160
Women
185
Religion
201
Notes
222
Bibliography
233
Index
251
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About the author (2004)

Brian Galligan is a professor of political science and head of the political science department at the University of Melbourne. He is the coauthor of "Australians and Globalisation" and the coeditor of "Defining Australian Citizenship" and "A Federal Republic." Dr. Winsome Roberts is a professor of political science at the University of Melbourne. She is a former policy analyst and advisor in the Victoria Public Service.

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