Exploring Mercury: The Iron Planet

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Jul 15, 2003 - Science - 216 pages
Strom: Mercury How did Mercury get such an enormous iron core? Why is its tectonic framework so different from any other planet or satellite? What is its crystal composition? Why is the crust so depleted in iron when the interior is so rich in that element? What are the polar deposits? Where do the elements in the exosphere come from? Mercury is a planet shrouded in mystery. Only 45 percent of its surface has been seen in any detail, and that was from the Mariner 10 flyby in 1974. Yet what is known only makes the planet more fascinating. New Earth-based observations have shed light on surface and exosphere compositions, and re-evaluations of the Mariner 10 data, using modern image processing techniques, show evidence for volcanic flow fronts, pyroclastics and other volcanic phenomena not seen before. This ground-breaking book not only chronicles what has been discovered, but looks ahead to what has yet to emerge. An accompanying CD contains all the best Mariner 10 images, including the data for each image, photomosaics and maps.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

All about mercury
It is closes to the sun it is 59 feet form the sun

Contents

The twilight planet
1
12 EARLIEST OBSERVATIONS AND RECORDING IN MYTHOLOGY
2
13 EARLY TELESCOPIC OBSERVATIONS
3
14 MODERN TELESCOPIC OBSERVATIONS
7
15 RESEARCH TELESCOPIC FACILITIES
9
153 Future observations
10
The Mariner 10 mission
13
221 NASA chose the Jet Propulsion Laboratory
14
834 The FeO band in Mercurian spectra
100
835 MidIR spectroscopy
101
837 Reststrahlen bands and emissivity maxima EM
103
838 Transparency minima TM
105
839 Comparison to the Moon
107
84 WHERE IS THE IRON AT MERCURY?
108
842 For Mercury low oxidized iron
109
85 SUMMARY
110

23 THE FLIGHT PLAN
16
233 Scientific payload
17
24 MARINER 10 GOES TO MERCURY
20
242 Trouble begins
21
243 Systems restored
23
25 THE FIRST MERCURY ENCOUNTER MERCURY I
25
252 The first real surprise
26
253 A very thin atmosphere no molecular species found
27
254 Hot hotter hottest
28
262 Conflicts over experiments and spacecraft control
29
263 Decisions were made
30
27 THE THIRD ENCOUNTER MERCURY III
33
272 Magnetic field measurements
34
Mercurys motions
37
311 A highly eccentric orbit
39
313 Inclined to be noticed
40
2 spin orbit resonance
41
316 No seasonal variations
43
32 MERCURY AND RELATIVITY
44
Mercurys size mass and density
47
43 DENSITY
49
432 Mercury has the greatest uncompressed density of any planet
51
Mercurys magnetic field and internal constitution
55
512 Comparison to Earths magnetic field
56
513 Mercurys magnetic field could be remanent
57
52 REMANENT MAGNETIC FIELDS ON THE MOON
58
54 A NEW LOOK AT OLD DATA
60
55 INTERIOR STRUCTURE AND CONSTITUTION
61
553 Relevance of Mercurys surface composition to the magnetic field question
62
562 Space weathering
63
Mercurys surfacebounded exosphere
65
613 Sunlight interacting with matter
66
614 Exospheric pressure?
67
62 EXOSPHERIC ATOMS AND MULTIPLE SPEED COMPONENTS
69
623 Atoms in escape
70
631 Differentiating one source from another
71
General surface features and radar characteristics
73
72 MAJOR SURFACE FEATURES
76
722 Mercury is unique
77
732 Naming features on Mercury
79
74 RADAR CHARACTERISTICS AND SPECIAL FEATURES
83
742 The Goldstein features
84
743 Radar observations discover highly backscattering polar deposits
85
Surface composition
91
811 Mercurys EUV UVVIS and nearIR albedo
92
812 Changes of albedo with phase change
93
82 MATERIALS OF TERRESTRIAL PLANETARY SURFACES
96
83 MERCURYS SURFACE COMPOSITION
98
831 Measuring surface composition with a telescope
99
The impact cratering record
111
92 CRATER FORMATION
112
923 Volatilization and melting of surface and impactor
113
932 Difference in Physical Properties of Lunar and Mercurian Highlands
114
94 EJECTA DEPOSITS
117
943 Crater degradation
118
95 THE CALORIS AND OTHER IMPACT BASINS
119
96 HILLY AND LINEATED TERRAIN
125
97 ORIGIN OF IMPACTING BODIES
128
972 Elusive vulcanoids
129
973 Evidence for two collisional populations
130
974 Surfaces younger than the period of heavy bombardment
135
98 RELATIVE AND ABSOLUTE AGES
137
981 Mercurys surface is ancient
139
Plains smooth and intercrater
141
103 THE INTERCRATER PLAINS SOME DETAILS
142
1032 Crater degradation by intercrater plains
144
104 SMOOTH PLAINS SOME DETAILS
145
105 ORIGINS OF PLAINS
146
1051 Mercurys smooth plains as impact basin ejecta deposits or impact melt
147
1052 Mercurys smooth plains as volcanic deposits
148
1053 Mercurys intercrater plains as volcanic deposits
151
106 MODES OF VOLCANIC PLAINS FORMATION
152
1062 Terrestrial magmas and temperature
153
1063 What type of volcanism occurred on Mercury?
154
1064 Compositions of Mercurys plains
155
Tectonics
157
1111 Fault types and mechanics
158
1112 Topographic expression
160
1122 Distribution and age
161
1123 The shrunken planet
164
1124 Thrusting lithospheric and crustal thickness
165
1133 Despinning fault pattern
166
History and origin
169
1221 Scenario 1 an active dipole
170
1222 Scenario 2 a remanent field
172
1231 Chemical equilibrium models
173
1233 Which hypothesis is correct?
174
Future exploration of Mercury
181
1321 Mission objectives
182
1322 Science experiments
183
133 THE EUROPEJAPAN BEPI COLOMBO MISSION
184
Orbital and physical data for Mercury
185
Glossary of terms
187
Names and Locations of Mercurys Surface Features
195
Bibliography
203
Index
211
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information