A Theory of Justice

Portada
Oxford University Press, 1999 - 538 páginas
In this work the author argues that the correct principles of justice are those that would be agreed to by free and rational persons, placed in the original position behind a veil of ignorance: not knowing their own place in society; their class, race, or sex; their abilities, intelligence, or strengths; or even their conception ofthe good. Accordingly, he derives two principles of justice to regulate the distribution of liberties, and of social and economic goods. In this new edition the work is presented as Rawls himself wishes it to be transmitted to posterity, with numerous minor revisions and amendments and a new Preface in which Rawls reflects on his presentation of his thesis and explains how and why he has revised it.
 

Comentarios de usuarios - Escribir una reseña

Puntuaciones de los usuarios

5 estrellas
6
4 estrellas
1
3 estrellas
2
2 estrellas
1
1 estrella
0

Review: A Theory of Justice

Reseña de usuario  - Alex L - Goodreads

BLEH. Never taking a political theory class again. But this book was rather odd...i liked the ideas he proposed, but it wasn't as enjoyable of a read as i thought it would be. Not really my subject matter. Leer reseña completa

Páginas seleccionadas

Índice

I
xi
II
xvii
III
1
IV
3
V
47
VI
102
VII
169
VIII
171
IX
228
X
293
XI
345
XII
347
XIII
397
XIV
450
Página de créditos

Otras ediciones - Ver todo

Términos y frases comunes

Referencias a este libro

Development as Freedom
Amartya Sen
No hay ninguna vista previa disponible - 1999
Development as Freedom
Amartya Sen
No hay ninguna vista previa disponible - 1999
Todos los resultados de la Búsqueda de libros »

Sobre el autor (1999)

John Rawls, professor of philosophy at Harvard University, had published a number of articles on the concept of justice as fairness before the appearance of his magnum opus, A Theory of Justice (1971). While the articles had won for Rawls considerable prestige, the reception of his book thrust him into the front ranks of contemporary moral philosophy. Presenting a Kantian alternative to conventional utilitarianism and intuitionism, Rawls offers a theory of justice that is contractual and that rests on principles that he alleges would be accepted by free, rational persons in a state of nature, that is, of equality. The chorus of praise was loud and clear. Stuart Hampshire acclaimed the book as "the most substantial and interesting contribution to moral philosophy since the war."H. A. Bedau declared: "As a work of close and original scholarship in the service of the dominant moral and political ideology of our civilization, Rawls's treatise is simply without a rival." Rawls historically achieved two important things: (1) He articulated a coherent moral philosophy for the welfare state, and (2) he demonstrated that analytic philosophy was most capable of doing constructive work in moral philosophy. A Theory of Justice has become the most influential work in political, legal, and social philosophy by an American author in the twentieth century.

Información bibliográfica