The Trans-Caucasian campaign of the Turkish army under Omer Pasha: a personal narrative

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W. Blackwood and sons, 1856 - Crimean War, 1853-1856 - 234 pages
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Page xiv - It was clear to all present that, whether the Russians besieged or turned Kars, the Turkish army required an effort to be made for its relief with all practicable despatch, and that of three possible modes of acting for that purpose, the only one likely to prove effective was an expedition by Kmais iuto Georgia.
Page 146 - They thought in short that it were better to " bear the ills they had than fly to others that they knew not of.
Page 215 - Ealeh alone, but which she most unjustly exercises throughout the whole length of the coast. By throwing Mingrelia open to commercial enterprise, a new and profitable market would be created for our manufactures, whilst the resources of the country would be developed, and the prosperity of the population proportionately advanced. It does not seem that in making these demands we should be asking, either with respect to Abkhasia or Mingrelia, more than we have a right to expect ; but whether we make...
Page 215 - Both these objects (the promotion of English and Mingrelian interests), as it appears to me, might be gained by stipulations which should have the effect of abolishing those mercantile restrictions which have retarded the progress of the province, and of doing away with that monopoly of trade which Russia purchased at Redout Ealeh alone, but which she most unjustly exercises throughout the whole length of the coast.
Page 22 - Circassians, rode a bandsome grey-haired man, whose tall cap of pure white distinguished him from those by whom he was surrounded. There was that in his bearing, moreover, which at once marked him as a chief of note ; and I was not surprised to observe that, on his dismounting, every one of his followers sprang from his horse and dashed at the great man's bridle, as though vying with one another who should be the first to render him a service. He received their attentions in an easy, off-hand manner,...
Page 54 - Highness got over the ground, removed all danger of our making ourselves ill from any such indulgence. We splashed along, followed by fifty or sixty mounted orderlies, through mud and jungle, until we emerged upon an open space on which a village was situated, when the women and children rushed frightened and crying into their konaks, and the men collected round the doors not a little bewildered and astonished at so unusual an apparition. However, they soon regained confidence, and came to kiss the...
Page xix - Suleau, attached to my staff, proceeds with this letter, ostensibly for the purpose of restoring his health. General Pelissier has also charged him with a mission to the French minister on the same subject. I earnestly, therefore, beg your Excellency to use your powerful influence with the Porte to cause our opinion to prevail over that of his Highness, for great public interests are at stake, and serious consequences might result from his success.
Page 55 - Theircostume is by no means so picturesque as that of the men : it consisted simply of a sort of loose dressing-gown open at the bosom, and confined by a girdle at the waist. Most of the houses are constructed of " wattle and dab," and thatched with the stalks of Indian corn. Meantime the male portion of the community had not been idle, and we found a breakfast of youghourt (sour milk), honey, pasta (Indian-corn bread), and pumpkin, by no means unacceptable after our ride. Omer...
Page 216 - It does not seem that in making these demands we should be asking, either with respect to Abkhasia or Mingrelia, more than we have a right to expect ; but whether we make peace and obtain independence for one, and free trade for the other ; or make war, and gain only a valuable strategical position for ourselves, let us hope that those political and military men who have hitherto riveted their delighted gaze upon the shattered docks of Sebastopol, may extend the range of their mental vision to the...
Page 9 - Mounted Circassians, on wiry little ponies, were galloping in every direction. Their saddles are high and narrow ; their stirrups so short, as to throw the knee almost at right angles to the horse. They seem at home only on horseback, and congregated in knots at the corners of the streets, or dismounted to ransack, in the hope of finding more spoil, some house which had already been thoroughly gutted. They watched us with no little curiosity as we walked up to a habitation which Sefer Pasha had put...

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