The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volume 6

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P. F. Collier & Son, 1901 - Byzantine Empire
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Review: The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, vol. 1-3: Volumes 1, 2, 3 (The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire #1)

User Review  - Drayton Alan - Goodreads

I enjoyed this history although I felt it went off on tangents in a few places. Read full review

Review: Great Books of the Western World

User Review  - Richard Durham - Goodreads

A good interpretation of the St. John's College reading list. Read full review

Contents

I
15
II
86
III
134
IV
187
V
233
VI
268
VII
299
VIII
341
IX
387
X
442
XI
472
XII
526
XIII
575
XIV
626

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Page 654 - I wrote the last lines of the last page, in a summer house in my garden. After laying down my pen, I took several turns in a berceau, or covered walk of acacias, which commands a prospect of the country, the lake, and the mountains.
Page 136 - Greeks, who deny the procession of the Holy Ghost from the Son, as well as from the Father.
Page 290 - At first, all will be dark and comfortless ; but if you persevere day and night, you will feel an ineffable joy; and no sooner has the soul discovered the place of the heart, than it is involved in a mystic and ethereal light.
Page 505 - At daybreak, without the customary signal of the morning gun, the Turks assaulted the city, by sea and land ; and the similitude of a twined or twisted thread has been applied to the closeness and continuity of their line of attack.
Page 654 - I will not dissemble the first emotions of joy on the recovery of my freedom, and perhaps the establishment of my fame. But my pride was soon humbled, and a sober melancholy was spread over my mind, by the idea that I had taken an everlasting leave of an old and agreeable companion, and that whatsoever might be the future date of my History, the life of the historian must be short and precarious.
Page 648 - The inside was damaged ; but in the middle of the sixteenth century, an era of taste and learning, the exterior circumference of one thousand six hundred and twelve feet was still entire and inviolate ; a triple elevation of fourscore arches, which rose to the height of one hundred and eight feet. Of the present ruin, the nephews of Paul the Third are the guilty agents...
Page 501 - After a siege of forty days, the fate of Constantinople could no longer be averted. The diminutive garrison was exhausted by a double attack; the fortifications which had stood for ages against hostile violence, were dismantled on all sides by the Ottoman cannon; many breaches were opened; and near the gate of St. Romanus, four towers had been levelled with the ground.
Page 162 - As they passed along, they gazed with admiration on the capital of the East, or, as it should seem, of the earth; rising from her seven hills, and towering over the continents of Europe and Asia. The swelling domes and lofty spires of five hundred palaces and churches were gilded by the sun and reflected in the waters ; the walls were crowded with soldiers and spectators, whose numbers they beheld, of whose temper they were ignorant; and each heart was chilled by the reflection, that, since the beginning...
Page 290 - ... thoughts towards the middle of thy belly, the region of the navel, and search the place of the heart, the seat of the soul. At first all will be dark and comfortless, but if...
Page 440 - Before the revival of classic literature, the Barbarians in Europe were immersed in ignorance; and their vulgar tongues were marked with the rudeness and poverty of their manners. The students of the more perfect idioms of Rome and Greece were introduced to a new world of light and science ; to the society of the free and polished nations of antiquity; and to a familiar converse with those immortal men who spoke the sublime language of eloquence and reason.

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