Logical Modalities from Aristotle to Carnap

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Max Cresswell, Edwin Mares, Adriane Rini
Cambridge University Press, Sep 15, 2016 - Mathematics - 348 pages
Interest in the metaphysics and logic of possible worlds goes back at least as far as Aristotle, but few books address the history of these important concepts. This volume offers new essays on the theories about the logical modalities (necessity and possibility) held by leading philosophers from Aristotle in ancient Greece to Rudolf Carnap in the twentieth century. The story begins with an illuminating discussion of Aristotle's views on the connection between logic and metaphysics, continues through the Stoic and mediaeval (including Arabic) traditions, and then moves to the early modern period with particular attention to Locke and Leibniz. The views of Kant, Peirce, C. I. Lewis and Carnap complete the volume. Many of the essays illuminate the connection between the historical figures studied, and recent or current work in the philosophy of modality. The result is a rich and wide-ranging picture of the history of the logical modalities.
 

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Contents

Contents
7
Aristotle on the Necessity of the Consequence
11
Aristotle on OneSided Possibility
29
Why Does Aristotle Need a Modal Syllogistic?
50
Necessity Possibility and Determinism in Stoic Thought
70
Necessity in Avicenna and the Arabic Tradition
91
Early Twelfth
113
Ockham and the Foundations of Modality in
133
Leibnizs Theories of Necessity
194
Leibniz and the Lucky Proof
218
Jonathan Westphal 12 Divine Necessity and Kants Modal Categories
232
Charles Sanders Peirce on Necessity
256
Catherine Legg and Cheryl Misak 14 The Development of C I Lewiss Philosophy
279
Carnaps Modal Predicate Logic
298
Bibliography
317
Index
339

Theological and Scientific Applications of the Notion
154

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About the author (2016)

Max Cresswell taught philosophy at Victoria University of Wellington from 1963 to 1999, and has taught there again part-time since 2009. He has published over 150 articles and eleven books, including three widely used texts on modal logic with G. E. Hughes, and most recently, with Adriane Rini, The World-Time Parallel (Cambridge, 2012).

Edwin Mares is Professor of Philosophy at Victoria University of Wellington. His publications include Relevant Logic: A Philosophical Interpretation (Cambridge, 2004), A Priori (2011), and, with Stuart Brock, Realism and Anti-Realism (2007).

Adriane Rini is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Massey University, New Zealand. She is the author of Aristotle's Modal Proofs (2011) and, with Max Cresswell, The World-Time Parallel (Cambridge, 2012).