China in Decay: The Story of a Disappearing Empire

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Chapman & Hall, 1900 - China - 418 pages
 

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Page 87 - Ho-choong-taung, and two of the principal persons of his household, were close to him, and always spoke to him upon their knees. The princes of his family, the tributaries and great officers of state being already arranged in their respective places in the tent, the president of the tribunal of rites conducted the Embassador, who was attended by his page and Chinese interpreter, and accompanied by the Minister Plenipotentiary, near to the foot of the throne...
Page 7 - The rivers of China are of the utmost importance to the Empire, inasmuch as they afford what is practically the only means of communication between the different territories. Roads are few and bad, the highway consisting, in most instances, of the merest track, and in the alluvial lands and those districts in which the loess beds* are situated, the paths are often knee-deep in mud.
Page 87 - ... the few steps that led to the throne, and bending on one knee, presented the box, with a short address to his imperial majesty...
Page 12 - Yang-tse, and the Woosung River, with its port of Shanghai, we reach Nimrod Sound, the approach to Ningpo hard by Sanmoon Bay, which is in itself a harbour capable of sheltering the navies of the world. From this point to the southern border of the Empire the coast line teems with creeks and bays of the first class. Bullock Harbour, Namkuan Harbour, the Samsah inlet, and the entrance to the Min River are all especially favoured ; and the harbours of Hinghua, Amoy, Tung San, Swatow, Mirs-bay, Bocca...
Page 218 - The coal-fields of the province have been surveyed by Baron Richthofen, the greatest authority on the subject, and he states that the coal of Shantung is of good quality, black and hard, burning with a clear flame, and making excellent coke ; it has great heating power. But the beds lie low, and, in consequence, the pits are soon flooded, as the natives do not understand how to keep the water down. In the winter months...
Page 113 - Chinese government; 2dly, to obtain for the merchants trading with China an indemnification for the loss of their property, incurred by threats of violence offered by persons under the direction of the Chinese government; and...
Page 255 - Canton, the concession tends to become stagnant, being shut off from the wave of growing prosperity around it and hampered by a cordon of likin surveillance. The plan of a settlement seems preferable in every respect except that of providing an area for the exclusive residence of Westerns ; and this want might be met in the case of a settlement by the provision of a special site for foreign residence. The point is that a sufficient space should be provided for manufacture, the preparation of such...
Page 121 - Pottinger treaties," he said, " inflicted a deep wound upon the pride, but by no means altered the policy, of the Chinese government. . . . Their purpose is now, as it ever was, not to invite, not to facilitate, but to impede and resist the access of foreigners. It must, then, ever be borne in mind, in considering the state of our relations with these regions, that the two governments have objects at heart which are diametrically opposed, except in so far that both earnestly desire to avoid all hostile...
Page 113 - Government ; and, in the second place, they were to obtain for the merchants trading with China, an indemnification for the loss of their property incurred by threats of violence offered by persons under the direction of the Chinese Government ; and, in the last place, they were to obtain a certain security that persons and property, in future trading with China, shall be protected from insult and injury, and that their trade and commerce be maintained upon a proper footing.
Page 226 - Very little money is lying idle in business ; but there is some hoarding of silver among the country squire and farming class. The most curious feature in this system of banking is that there are no advances against goods, but only on personal security. The only instance of an advance against goods I heard of was in Sechuan at Chiating Fu where an owner sometimes places insect wax in the house of a man who advances against it. But this is a clumsy transaction, only applicable to goods of fixed quality...

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