Cotton & Capital: Boston Businessmen and Antislavery Reform, 1854-1868

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Univ of Massachusetts Press, 1991 - Political Science - 294 pages
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Abbott examines the activities and ideology of a group of Boston-area businessmen who promoted the cause of black freedom from the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act to the election of Ulysses A. Grant as president. These men established a variety of voluntary associations to lobby against slavery and southern political influence, to recruit black soldiers for the Union army,and to aid former slaves during the early years of Reconstruction. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
Cotton Capital and Conscience
10
The New England Emigrant Aid Company
28
The Emergence of the Republican Party
50
Cheap Cotton by Free Labor
72
Destroying Slavery and Supporting Lincoln
94
Recruiting a Black Army
113
Questions of Land and Labor
138
Social and Economic Reconstruction
166
Political Reconstruction
194
Epilogue
223
Notes
235
Bibliography
277
Index
287
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About the author (1991)

Richard H. Abbott (1936-2000) was a professor of history at Eastern Michigan University and the author of The Republican Party and the South and Cotton and Capital.

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