The Profitable Planter: A Treatise on the Theory and Practice of Planting Forest Trees ... ...

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author, 1808 - Forests and forestry - 222 pages
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Page 50 - is planted with fuccefs, on the moft barren commons, where no other tree or plant (the Heath excepted) will grow. On fcites which are elevated, and expofed to particular currents of wind, it often proves the only tree that can be got up, except fo far as others may rife under its
Page 181 - is a fort of hack or hoe, of the length of eight inches from the eye; the face or edge four and a half broad, and the handle twelve long; the heel or part behind the eye is made ftronger than the other parts of it, in order to
Page 54 - barren commons, where no other tree or plant (the Heath excepted) will grow. On fcites which are elevated, and expofed to particular currents of wind, it often proves the only tree that can be got up, except fo far as others may rife under its
Page 78 - is the bark, which on a ftem or branch, of from two to four or five years' growth, is always found fmoother, and of a much darker colour than any
Page 84 - admit of a greater quantity of trees being planted upon an acre, or otherwife they allow to every one an increafed quantity of furface.—To demonftrate this
Page 25 - cannot profit? Of the truth of thefe remarks we have ample proof-, for the planters of the laft age generally ufed Scotch Firs only, in a, manner that leaves us at a lofs to difcover what end they had in view, unlefs it was the rehearfal of their own funerals ; certainly, if their
Page 80 - upon a plantation of thefe trees as an ample " portion for a daughter, and none of the
Page 206 - of planting fhould be fo far extended as to intrench upon agriculture ; the danger however, I conceive, lies entirely on the other fide; for, though an old planter, I have never known much land devoted to planting that was of confiderable value for corn or grafs, except fo far as taking a part to improve the reft, by
Page 172 - never be forgotten, that as, in being removed, a plant of two feet lofes a greater proportion of its roots than a tree of one, and one of three feet a greater proportion than one of two, and fo on, in proportion to its former ftrength and height, fo the larger the plants, fo much greater is the
Page 22 - reflect on the prefent fcarcity, and confequent advance of price; and our ideas will probably turn to the day, not long elapfed, when Fir Timber was fold at little more than one third of what it now is. Indeed, fo long as we depend

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