Journal of the Royal Horticultural Society, Volume 15

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The Society., 1893 - Botany
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Vols. for 1869-1952 include Extracts from the proceedings of the Royal Horicultural Society.
 

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Page 4 - O'ER the bare woods, whose outstretched hands Plead with the leaden heavens in vain, I see, beyond the valley lands, The sea's long level dim with rain. Around me all things, stark and dumb, Seem praying for the snows to come, And, for the summer bloom and greenness gone, With winter's sunset lights and dazzling morn atone.
Page 47 - Some glossy-leaved, and shining in the sun, The maple, and the beech of oily nuts Prolific, and the lime at dewy eve Diffusing odours : nor unnoted pass The sycamore, capricious in attire. Now green, now tawny, and ere autumn yet Have changed the woods, in scarlet honours bright.
Page 61 - If he who makes two blades of grass grow where but one grew before...
Page vi - The hearty thanks of the Society are due to the Chiswick Board and to all the members of the standing Committees — viz., the Scientific, the Fruit and Vegetable, the Floral, the Orchid, and the Narcissus Committees, for the kind and patient attention which they have severally given to their departments ; also to the exhibitors who have contributed to so great an extent to produce the valuable results of the various conferences held.
Page xxiii - ... are formed in the cells of the leaves even in the dark. The chemical process, on the contrary, by which the green colour is produced has a complicated dependence on light. If, for instance, the temperature is sufficiently high, the green colouring substance is formed in the cotyledons of Conifers and in the leaves of Ferns in complete darkness as well as under the influence of light*.
Page v - Society are due to all those who, either at home or abroad, bave so kindly and liberally presented books to the Library or plants or seeds to the Gardens. A list of the donors has been prepared, and will be found in the Society's " Journal,
Page 187 - The best laid schemes o' mice and men Gang aft a-gley, And lea'e us nought but grief and pain, For promised joy.
Page v - The best thanks of the Society are due to all those who, either at home or abroad, have so kindly and liberally presented books to the Library or plants or seeds to the Gardens. A list of the donors has been prepared, and will appear in the next number of the Journal.
Page xxx - ... paddy-insect." This grub is found on a sort of maple. When full-grown it is thrown into boiling vinegar, on which the " head " of the gut, or " silk," appears; this is sharply torn out with both hands drawn apart, and is as long as the space between them, say five feet ; it is so strong that one single thread of it is sufficient to make a line with which to catch the smaller kinds of li-h.
Page xxxviii - Science. 3. Previous to the conferring of the degree the candidate must prepare and submit a satisfactory thesis upon some special or technical subject selected by him with the approval of the professor in charge of the department in which he desires to graduate.

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