History of the United States Secret Service

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L.C. Baker, 1867 - Secret service - 704 pages
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Page 550 - B8' of lawful age being duly sworn according to law, doth depose and say, that he is...
Page 472 - ... he heard the discharge of a pistol behind him, and . looking around, saw, through the smoke, a man between the door and the President. At the same time deponent heard him shout some word, which deponent thinks was
Page 503 - Baker repeated this, saying at the same time, 'Booth, do I repeat it correctly ?' Booth nodded his head. "By this time the gray ness of dawn was approaching; moving figures, inquisitively coming near, were to be seen distinctly, and the cocks began to crow gutturally, though the barn by this time was a hulk of blaze and ashes, sending toward the zenith a spiral line of dense smoke. "The women became importunate at this time that the troops might be ordered to extinguish the fire, which waa spreading...
Page 472 - On reaching the outer door of the passage-way, as above described, deponent found it barred by a heavy piece of plank, one end of which was secured in the wall, and the other resting against the door. It had been so securely fastened that it required considerable force to remove it. This wedge, or bar, was about four feet from the floor. Persons upon the outside were beating against the door for the purpose of entering. Deponent removed the bar, and the door was opened. Several persons, who represented...
Page 502 - His eyes were lustrous like fever, and swelled and rolled in terrible anxiety, while his teeth were fixed, and he wore the expression of one in the calmness before frenzy. In. vain he peered with vengeance in his look; the blaze that made him visible concealed his enemy. A second he turned glaring at the fire, as if to leap...
Page 498 - The trembling old man obeyed, and in a moment the imperfect rays flared upon his whitening hairs, and bluishly pallid face. Then the question was repeated, backed up by the glimmering pistol. " Where are these men?" The old man held to the wall, and his knees smote each other. "They are gone,
Page 471 - When the party entered the box, a cushioned arm-chair was standing at the end of the box furthest from the stage and nearest the audience. This was also the nearest point to the door by which the box is entered. The President seated himself in this chair — and except that he once left the chair for the purpose of putting on his overcoat, remained so seated until he was shot. Mrs. Lincoln was seated in a chair between the. President and the pillar in the centre above described. At the opposite end...
Page 485 - Lincoln, on the Baltimore pike, his horse threw him headlong. Afoot and bewildered, he resolved to return to the city, whose lights he could plainly see ; but before doing so he concealed himself some time, and made some almost absurd efforts to disguise himself. Cutting a cross section from the woolen undershirt which covered his muscular arm, he made a rude cap of it, and threw away his bloody coat. This has since been found in the woods, and blood has been found also on his bosom and sleeves....
Page 486 - All this apparel consorted ill with his assumed character. Coarse, and hard, and calm, Mrs. Surratt shut up her house after the murder, and waited with her daughters till the officers came. She was imperturbable, and rebuked her girls for weeping, and would have gone to jail like a statue, but that in her extremity Payne knocked at her door. He had come, he said, to dig a ditch for Mrs. Surratt, whom he very well knew. But Mrs. Surratt protested that she had never seen the man at all, and had no...
Page 502 - And so he dashed, intent to expire not unaccompanied, a disobedient sergeant at an eyehole drew upon him the fatal bead. The barn was all glorious with conflagration, and in the beautiful ruin this outlawed man strode like all that we know of wicked valor, stern in the face of death. A shock, a shout, a gathering up of his splendid figure as if to overtip the stature God gave him, and John Wilkes Booth fell headlong to the floor, lying there in a heap, a little life remaining. But no.

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