Crime and the American Dream

Front Cover
Wadsworth Publishing Company, 1997 - Anomy - 124 pages
0 Reviews
Using the basic ideas, insights, and conceptual tools of sociology, Messner and Rosenfeld present a provocative introduction to alternative ways of thinking about crime. They provide both an insightful and comprehensive analysis of the Anomie tradition as well as other existing theories while offering a distinctive theoretical perspective to explain the exceptionally high levels of serious crime in the United States. They integrate empirical and quantitative data with ethnographic and qualitative data to provide a clear, succinct and unique discussion of crime and the American dream which is both accessible and interesting to students.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

A SOCIETY ORGANIZED FOR CRIME
1
The Rise Fall and Revival of the Anomie Perspective
11
WhiteCollar Crimes
27
Copyright

6 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1997)

Steven F. Messner is Distinguished Teaching Professor of Sociology at the University at Albany, State University of New York. He received his Ph.D. from Princeton University and has taught at Columbia University and Nankai University in the People's Republic of China. His research has focused primarily on the relationship between features of social organization and violent crime rates. His other books include PERSPECTIVES ON CRIME AND DEVIANCE, (with Allen E. Liska), THEORETICAL INTEGRATION IN THE STUDY OF DEVIANCE AND CRIME, (with Marvin D. Krohn and Allen E. Liska), and CRIME AND SOCIAL CONTROL IN A CHANGING CHINA (with Jianhong Liu and Lening Zhang). Dr. Messner has also authored numerous articles and book chapters on the topic of criminal violence and is a Fellow of the American Society of Criminology.

Richard Rosenfeld is a Curators Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri-St. Louis and a past President of the American Society of Criminology. He has written several articles on violent crime, crime statistics, and crime control policy, and his current research focuses on explaining changes in crime rates over time. He is an ASC Fellow and has served on the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Law and Justice.

Bibliographic information