The Lyon Campaign in Missouri: Being a History of the First Iowa Infantry and of the Causes which Led Up to Its Organization, and how it Earned the Thanks of Congress, which it Got : Together with a Birdseye View of the Conditions in Iowa Preceding the Great Civil War of 1861

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Crane, 1907 - Missouri - 377 pages
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Page 81 - Den I wish I was in Dixie, hooray, hooray! In Dixie Land I'll take my stand, To lib and die in Dixie; Away, away, away down south in Dixie; Away, away, away down south in Dixie.
Page 330 - The enemy could frequently be seen within twenty feet of Totten's guns, and the smoke of the opposing lines was often so confounded as to seem but one. Now, for the first time during the day, our entire line maintained its position with perfect firmness.
Page 354 - General Lyon, sustained the honor of the flag, and achieved victory against overwhelming numbers at the battle of Springfield, in Missouri ; and that, in order to commemorate an event so honorable to the country and to themselves, it is ordered that each regiment engaged shall be authorized to bear upon its colors the word, "Springfield," embroidered in letters of gold.
Page 349 - Colonel Mitchell. In a few moments the Colonel fell severely wounded ; about the same time a fatal ball was lodged in the General's breast, and he was carried from the field a corpse. Thus gloriously fell as brave a soldier as ever drew a sword — a man whose honesty of purpose was proverbial — a noble patriot, and one who held his life as nothing when his country demanded it of him.
Page 309 - He has taken a strong position, and is recruiting his supply of horses, mules, and provisions by forages into the surrounding country, his large force of mounted men enabling him to do this without much annoyance from me. I find my position extremely embarrassing, and am at present unable to determine whether I shall be able to maintain my ground or be forced to retire. I can resist any attack from the front, but if the enemy move to surround me I must retire. I shall hold my ground as long as possible,...
Page 353 - That the thanks of Congress are hereby given to the brave officers and soldiers who, under the command of the late General Lyon, sustained the honor of...
Page 330 - ... fatal ball was lodged in the General's breast, and he was carried from the field a corpse. Thus gloriously fell as brave a soldier as ever drew a sword — a man whose honesty of purpose was proverbial — a noble patriot, and one who held his life as nothing when his country demanded it of him. " Of this dire calamity I was not informed until perhaps half an hour after its occurrence.
Page 81 - I'll take my stand, To lib and die in Dixie; Away, away, away down south in Dixie; Away, away, away down south in Dixie. Old Missus marry Will-de-weaber, Willium was a gay deceaber; Look away, look away, look away, Dixie Land!
Page 257 - These three months volunteers would reenlist if they could be paid, but they are now dissatisfied, and if troops do not replace them, all that is gained may be lost. I have not been able to move for want of supplies, and this delay will exhaust the term of the three months men.
Page 308 - I have just received your note of the 6th instant, by special messenger. I retired to this place, as I have before informed you, reaching here on the 5th. The enemy followed to within ten miles of here. He has taken a strong position, and is recruiting his...

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