The Turk: The Life and Times of the Famous Eighteenth-century Chess-playing Machine

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Berkley Books, 2003 - Games & Activities - 272 pages
This is the true account of the 18th-century mechanical man, powered by clockwork, dressed in a Turkish costume, and capable of playing chess. Created by a Hungarian nobleman, the machine-man known as The Turk traveled Europe and America, made the acquaintance of Benjamin Franklin, Catherine the Great, Napoleon Bonaparte, and Edgar Allan Poe.

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User Review  - SeriousGrace - LibraryThing

Picture a bygone era ripe with new inventions. This was the industrial revolution. Everyone is coming up with something practical to make life easier or something clever to wow the public's ... Read full review

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User Review  - kalinichta - LibraryThing

I found the whole thing fun and intriguing in the beginning... but I think this may be a story better-suited to an article rather than a full book. I soon became bored with the repetitive detail and abandoned the book. Read full review

Contents

CHAPTER
1
CHAPTER
21
CHAPTER THREE
39
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Tom Standage, the technology correspondent for The Economist, has written for Wired, Prospect, The Guardian, and The Daily Telegraph.

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