The Eagle and the Dove: The American Peace Movement and United States Foreign Policy, 1900-1922

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John Whiteclay Chambers
Syracuse University Press, 1991 - Political Science - 237 pages
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This text offers an interpretation of the relationship between the peace movement and US foreign policy in America's formative years as a world power. It indicates the peace movement's significant influence upon American attitudes and its varying impact upon US foreign and defence policies.
 

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Contents

Editors Note
xiii
Introductory Essay
xxxi
Awakening of the Modern American Peace
1
Lucia Ames Mead Endorses Arbitration and
8
William James Proposes a Moral Equivalent of War
14
President William Howard Taft Supports General
20
Elihu Roots Nobel Peace Prize Speech on the Peace
28
Responding to War in Europe and Revolution
37
President Wilson Speaks Privately about Mediation
88
Social Work Leaders Endorse Wilson for President
90
Peace Movement Leaders Meet with President Wilson
104
Resolutions of the Peoples Council 1917
117
Plans for the Postwar Order The Peace Movement
135
Hamilton Holt The League or Bolshevism? 1919
149
President Wilsons Statement to the Senate Foreign
162
Debate over Releasing Wartime Offenders 1920
175

Emmeline Pethick Lawrence Addresses Americans
46
Alice Hamiltons Account of the International Congress
56
The Socialist Party of America Position Against the
62
A Discussion Between President Wilson and Leaders
69
The Peace Movement Helps
76
Secretary of State Charles Evans Hughes Shocks
190
Selected Bibliography
207
Index
223
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About the author (1991)

John Whiteclay Chambers II is Professor of History and former chair of the History Department at Rutgers University. A distinguished scholar in American history and in war and peace studies, he is the author or editor of nearly a dozen books.

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