A Handbook for Travellers in Turkey: Describing Constantinople, European Turkey, Asia Minor, Armenia, and Mesopotamia ...

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J. Murray, 1854 - Balkan Peninsula - 284 pages
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Page 28 - Turk us destitute of taste, because he has no pictures ; the Turk will consider the Englishman destitute of feeling, from his disregard of nature. The Turk will be horrified at prostitution and bastardy ; the Englishman at polygamy. The first will be disgusted at our haughty treatment of our inferiors ; the second will revolt at the purchase of slaves. They will reciprocally call each other fanatic in religion— dissolute in morals — uncleanly in habits — unhappy in the...
Page 28 - ... of change. The Englishman will esteem the Turk unhappy because he has no public amusements ; the Turk will reckon the man miserable who lacks amusements from home. The Englishman will look on the Turk as destitute of taste, because he has no pictures; the Turk will consider the Englishman destitute of feeling, from his disregard of nature.
Page 54 - F2 on the expanse of the sky. At first agglomerated in a single confused mass, the lesser parts of this immense whole seemed, as we advanced, by degrees to unfold, to disengage themselves from each other, and to grow into various groups, divided by wide chasms and deep indentures, — until...
Page 25 - ... hospitality. It was proffered to me by all ranks, from the Pasha to the peasant in his tent among the mountains, and was tendered as a thing of course, without the idea of any return being made. No question was asked ; distinction of nation or religion, of rich or poor, was not thought of; but feed the stranger was the universal law.
Page 26 - God is great,' and if the malady terminate in death, though of a child or parent, the nervous eye alone shows the working of the heart, and the body is committed to the grave with the submissive reflection, ' God is great and merciful.' The permission given by the Mahometan law to polygamy is one of the serious charges brought against the moral character of its professors. But though the law allows several wives, it is a liberty of which the people seldom take advantage. I have seen, in thousands...
Page 57 - ... dogs, who at intervals send forth such repeated bowlings that it requires practice to be able to sleep in spite of their noise. This silence is frequently disturbed by a fire, which is announced by the...
Page 92 - ... eye down a long vista lined with muslin draperies or robes of ermines and fur. The crowd in the Bazars, consisting chiefly of ladies, renders it difficult to pass through them, especially as more ceremony is required than amongst the well-dressed mob of an opera-house; and such are the extent and intricacy of these covered ways, that it would be a tiresome task to roam through the half of them in one morning. '• Not only these Bazars, but those which more resemble open streets, are severally...
Page 212 - Antipatrus having been slain by Amyntas, king of Galatia, Derbe fell into the power of the latter, who had already received Isauria from the Romans, upon its reduction by Servilius.
Page 125 - Xerxes' bridges must have been applied ; for the height of the neighbouring cliffs would have prevented the Persian monarch from adjusting them to any other position. There is certainly some ground to believe...
Page 91 - Valide-Han, which we visited, and which is reckoned one of the best in Constantinople, is ornamented with a thin grove of trees, with two handsome fountains, and the building, besides warehouses and stables on the ground-floor, has...

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