Eminent British Lawyers

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Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, 1830 - Great Britain - 428 pages
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Page 10 - God had endowed his Majesty with excellent science and great endowments of nature, but his Majesty was not learned in the laws of his realm of England ; and causes which concern the life or inheritance or goods or fortunes of his subjects are not to be decided by natural reason but by the artificial reason and judgment of law, which law is an act which requires long study and experience before that a man can attain to the cognizance of it...
Page 349 - Who is it/ said the jealous ruler over the desert, encroached upon by the restless foot of English adventurers, ( who is it that causes this river to rise in the high mountains, and to empty itself into the ocean ? Who is it that causes to blow the loud winds of winter, and that calms them again in the summer ? Who is it that rears up the shade of those lofty forests, and blasts them with the quick lightning at his pleasure ? The same Being who gave to you a country on the other side of the waters,...
Page 173 - Conspicuous scene ! another yet is nigh, (More silent far) where kings and poets lie; Where Murray (long enough his country's pride) Shall be no more than Tully or than Hyde...
Page 57 - Hyde was wont to say that he valued himself upon nothing more than upon having had Mr. Selden's acquaintance from the time he was very young, and held it with great delight as long as they were suffered to continue together in London ; and he was...
Page 42 - ... had it not been for Sir Edward Coke's Reports, (which though they may have errors, and some peremptory and extrajudicial resolutions more than are warranted ; yet they contain infinite good decisions, and rulings over of cases,) the law, by this time, had been almost like a ship without ballast ; for that the cases of modern experience are fled from those that are adjudged and ruled in former time.
Page 295 - That the influence of the Crown has increased, is increasing, and ought to be diminished"?
Page 333 - ... shelter, but I will not join in battle with them. Their vices, though screwed up to the highest pitch of human depravity, are not of dignity enough to vindicate the combat with me. I will drag him to light who is the dark mover behind this scene of iniquity. I assert that the Earl of...
Page 8 - Mr. Bacon, if you have any tooth against me, pluck it out ; for it will do you more hurt than all the teeth in your head will do you good.
Page 353 - But, at the conclusion of a ten years' war, how are we recompensed for the death of multitudes, and the expense of millions, but by contemplating the sudden glories of paymasters and agents, contractors and commissaries, whose equipages shine like meteors, and whose palaces rise like exhalations ! These are the men who, without virtue, labour, or hazard, are growing rich, as their country is impoverished ; they rejoice, when obstinacy or ambition adds another year to slaughter and devastation ; and...
Page 122 - I'll look after thee. I know thou hast a mighty party, and I see a great many of the brotherhood in corners, waiting to see what will become of their mighty Don, and a Doctor of the party (looking to Dr. Bates) at your elbow; but, by the grace of Almighty God, I'll crush you all.

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