A History of the Papacy from the Great Schism to the Sack of Rome, Volume 5

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Longmans, Green, and Company, 1897 - Church history
 

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Page 50 - ... atmosphere. There is no real reason for attributing the death of Alexander VI. to other than natural causes. The Borgia have become legendary as types of unrestrained wickedness, and it is difficult to judge them fairly without seeming to palliate iniquity. Yet justice demands a consideration how far they represented the tendencies of their age, and how far they went beyond them. The secularised Papacy and the immoral politics of Europe can excite nothing but disgust ; but the secularisation...
Page 271 - with God's help,' undertook to answer these questions. Following the Aristotelian method he discusses divers opinions and exposes the weakness of each. He concludes that the question of the immortality of the soul is a ' neutral problem like that of the eternity of the world; for no natural reasons can be brought forward which prove the soul to be immortal, still less which prove it to be mortal.
Page 149 - Alidosi fell to the ground, and was despatched by two of the duke's attendants. While all stood irresolute, the duke mounted his horse and rode off to Urbino.1 The murder was horrible enough ; but no one save the Pope regretted Alidosi's death. With uplifted hands the Cardinals gave thanks that he was gone, while Julius II. gave way to an unrestrained display of grief. He wept passionate tears, beating his breast and refusing all food ; he could not endure to stay in Ravenna, but left it next day...
Page 209 - Olim habuit Cypris sua tempora; tempora Mavors Olim habuit; sua nunc tempora Pallas habet, 'Venus ruled here with Alexander; Mars with Julius; now Pallas enters on her reign with Leo.
Page 57 - ... with an air of calm detachment amid the recklessness, the brutality, the fanaticism, the cynicism, the lasciviousness, of those Renaissance spirits. 'In his private life', Creighton says of Alexander VI, 'it is sufficiently clear that he was at little pains to repress a strongly sensual nature. . . . We may hesitate to believe the worst charges brought against him; but the evidence is too strong to enable us to admit that even after his accession to the papal office he discontinued the irregularities...
Page 190 - Italiano, serie i^a, xvi., pt. ii., 263: ' Fo ricordo con le lacrime agl' occhi e con gran dolore nel cuore come papa Giulio passo da questa vita presente, la cui vita quanto sia stata laudabile et onorevole...
Page 95 - ... church in Christendom to make way for something new. The basilica of S. Peter's had been for ages the object of pilgrimages from every land. Outside, it gleamed with mosaics, of which the ship of Giotto is now the only survival ; inside, its pavement was a marvel of mosaic art ; its pillars dated from the days of Constantine ; its monuments told the history of the Roman Church for centuries.
Page 221 - ... l So wrote Ficino, and came forward with his offering of a misty effort to set forth the image of Plato as closely resembling the truth of Christ ; but his philosophic miracle did not work conviction, his system did not reduce all gainsayers to silence. The question of the immortality of the soul continued to be openly disputed in the schools of Italy, and few were shocked by the discussion. We cannot feel surprised that the theologians in the , Council determined to make a protest against the...
Page 257 - Whilst we looked for the crown imperial,' wrote Pace, ' we might lose the crown of England, which is this day more esteemed than the emperor's crown and all his empire.
Page 332 - Et cosi si parti a 22 di April mccccxciiii. Et subito veduto questo lo Ambasciatore dello Re di Francia si protesto in concistorio contro dello Papa et appellose della detta dichiaratione allo futuro Consiglio, lo quale disse doveva essere et fare presto. Et in quello di ando lo figlio dello Papa et lo signore Vergilio ad arrare la sposa in Napoli con molto trionfo et molta festa. Et in eodem die saputo chebbe lo Cardinale di Santo Pietro ad Vincula, lo quale stava in Ostia, et era in disgratia dello...

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