Up Through the Water

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Grove Press, 1989 - Fiction - 162 pages
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Darcey Steinke's first novel, now back in print, is an unusually assured and lyrical debut. Set on an island resort town off North Carolina, it tells of summer people and islanders, mothers and sons, women and men, love and its dangers. It is the story of Emily, a woman free as the waves she swims in every day, of the man who wants to clip her wings, of her son and the summer that he will become a man. George Garrett called it "clean-cut, lean-lined, quickly moving, and audacious. . . . [Steinke is] compassionate without sentimentality, romantic without false feelings, and clearly and extravagantly gifted." "Beautifully written . . . a seamless and almost instinctive prose that often reads more like poetry than fiction." -- Robert Olmstead, The New York Times Book Review; "Dazzling and charged . . . Darcey Steinke has the sensuous and precise visions of female and male, and of the light and dark at the edge of the sea." -- John Casey.
 

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
3
Section 3
21
Section 4
27
Section 5
36
Section 6
46
Section 7
51
Section 8
53
Section 13
98
Section 14
104
Section 15
107
Section 16
115
Section 17
117
Section 18
122
Section 19
127
Section 20
137

Section 9
60
Section 10
69
Section 11
77
Section 12
86
Section 21
143
Section 22
149
Section 23
154
Copyright

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About the author (1989)

Darcey Steinke is the author of four novels, two of which were "New York Times "Notable Books of the Year. Her novel "Suicide Blonde "has been translated into eight languages, and her novel "Milk "has been translated into four. Her nonfiction has been featured in "Vogue," the "Washington Post," the "Chicago Tribune," the "Village Voice," "Spin," the "Boston Review," and the "New York Times Magazine," She currently teaches at both Columbia University and New School University in New York City. She lives with her daughter in Brooklyn.

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