Proverbs

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E. Walker, 1853 - Proverbs - 128 pages
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Contents

I
9
II
12
III
15
IV
18
V
21
VI
24
VII
27
VIII
30
XV
48
XVI
50
XVII
52
XVIII
54
XIX
56
XX
58
XXI
60
XXII
62

IX
32
X
35
XI
38
XII
41
XIII
44
XIV
46
XXIII
65
XXIV
68
XXV
71
XXVI
76
XXVII
79
XXVIII
80

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Page 26 - God's noblest sons, I think, will be selected from those that know how to take wealth, with all its temptations, and maintain godliness therewith. It is hard to ba a saint standing in a golden niche — И.
Page 56 - ... 8. As a storm conceals the glories of the sun and defaces the beauty of the landscape, even so do maddening passions deform the soul, bearing along with their impetuous waves both pestilence and death. CHAPTER XIX. 1. The difference between a puppy and a fool is this, — the one is born blind and continues so for nine days only, while the other remains with his eyes shut all his life. 2. As the farmer ploughs the ground and sows the seed, so does the minister of the gospel pray and preach ;...
Page 16 - If most married women possessed as much prudence as they do vanity, we should find many husbands far happier.
Page 25 - Never be angry with your neighbor because his religious views differ from yours, for all the branches of a tree do not lean the same way.
Page 120 - We are indebted to the author for a copy of a neat little volume, entitled " Proverbs: by Rev. William Scott Downey, BD...
Page 20 - Keligion protects, while sin exposes to shame and contempt. 12. While the wish of many individuals is to arrive at heaven, we daily behold them on the way to hell. CHAPTER V. 1. Family worship is a spiritual wall, which, if attended to, will keep from the Christian's door such temptations as he must be otherwise exposed to. 2. Whatever has been the fault of one woman may be the fault of another. 3. Ignorance and impudence are inseparable companions. 4. Riches have benefited tens, and ruined thousands.
Page 13 - ... last. 7. Should thy birth be noble, let good deeds show it; should thy birth be mean, let Christian graces beautify it. 8. Men possessing small souls are generally the authors of great evil. 9. To die happy you must live holy; receiving injuries without complaining, and readily forgiving them. 10. Better that ignorant men remain silent, than babble from the lack of argument 11. While travelling I have often noticed bull-dogs lying still while puppies were barking. 12. For a tutor to give a pupil...
Page 33 - ... parsons practise all they preach. 3. A flood of waters can but destroy the body; a deluge of sin must destroy both soul and body. 4. Wealth may conceal a man's faults, strength may rid him of his foes; but neither the one nor the other can bribe the monster Death, or overcome impartial Time. 5. The match which lit your candle will reduce a town to ashes. The smallest sin will endanger both the soul of the preacher and hearer. 6. To expect to reach heaven without living holy, is to expect to move...
Page 44 - The difference between religion and pleasure is this—the former enlightens and elevates, but the latter intoxicates and cankers. 5. It is not the mere mastication of the food which satisfies the hungry soul; neither is it the mere reading of the Bible that benefits the reader, but the digestion. 6. Of your neighbor's faults see little, hear little, and speak less than you either see, or hear.
Page 27 - ... merely for their riches; but rather for their philanthropy: we do not value the sun for its height, but for its use. CHAPTER VII. 1. Man ploughs the ground to make it prolific; God ploughs the heart to make us Christians. *2. The difference between a godly wife and a worldly one is this: the...

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