The female poets of America [ed.] by T.B. Read

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E.H. Butler & Company, 1852 - American poetry - 3 pages
 

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Page 43 - THE Frost looked forth one still, clear night, And whispered, " Now I shall be out of sight ; So through the valley and over the height, In silence I'll take my way. I will not go on like that blustering train, — The wind and the snow, the hail and the rain, Who make so much bustle and noise in vain, But I'll be as busy as they...
Page 166 - This beautiful, mysterious thing, This seeming visitant from heaven, This bird with the immortal wing, To me — to me, thy hand has given. The pulse first caught its tiny stroke, The blood its crimson hue, from mine — This life, which I have dared invoke, Henceforth is parallel with thine. A silent awe is in my room — I tremble with delicious fear; The future with its light and gloom, Time and Eternity are here.
Page 339 - Poor indeed thou must be, if around thee Thou no ray of light and joy canst throw ; If no silken cord of love hath bound thee To some little world through weal and woe...
Page 43 - Now, I shall be out of sight ; So through the valley and over the height, In silence I'll take my way ; I will not go on like that blustering train, The wind and the snow, the hail and the rain, Who make so much bustle and noise in vain ; — But I'll be as busy as they.
Page 41 - Whose head is towering towards the sky, Above such a worthless thing as I! Useless and vain, a cumberer here, I have been idling from year to year. But never, from this, shall a vaunting word From the humbled Pebble again be heard, Till something without me or within, Shall show the purpose for which I 've been !" The Pebble its vow could not forget, And it lies there wrapped in silence yet.
Page 311 - But thus to see, from day to day, Thy brightening eye and cheek, And watch thy life-sands waste away, Unnumbered, slowly, meek ; — To meet thy smiles of tenderness, And catch the feeble tone Of kindness, ever breathed to bless, And feel, I'll be " alone ;" — To mark thy strength each hour decay, And yet thy hopes grow stronger, As, filled with heaven-ward trust, they say, " Earth may not claim thee longer...
Page 310 - Have braved the haughty glance of pride Nor shed a single tear. I could have smiled on every blow From Life's full quiver thrown, While I might gaze on thee, and know I should not be
Page 22 - How beauteous art thou, 0 thou morning sun ! — The old man, feebly tottering forth, admires As much thy beauty, now life's dream is done, As when he moved exulting in his fires. The infant strains his little arms to catch The rays that glance about his silken hair; And Luxury hangs her amber lamps, to match Thy face, when turn'd away from bower and palace fair.
Page 44 - There were cities, with temples and towers ; and these All pictured in silver sheen. But he did one thing that was hardly fair, — He peeped in the cupboard, and finding there That all had forgotten for him to prepare, " Now, just to set them a-thinking, I'll bite this basket of fruit...
Page 410 - THEREFORE with Angels and Archangels, and with all the company of heaven, we laud and magnify thy glorious Name ; evermore praising thee, and saying : Holy, holy, holy, Lord God of hosts: Heaven and earth are full of thy glory: Glory be to thee, O Lord most High.

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