Delsarte system of expression...

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E.S. Werner, 1902 - Delsarte system - 507 pages
 

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Page 424 - Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus, but use all gently ; for in the very torrent, tempest, and, as I may say, the whirlwind of passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance that may give it smoothness. O, it offends me to the soul to hear a robustious periwig-pated 10 fellow tear a passion to tatters...
Page 156 - NEAR THIS SPOT ARE DEPOSITED THE REMAINS OF ONE WHO POSSESSED BEAUTY WITHOUT VANITY, STRENGTH WITHOUT INSOLENCE, COURAGE WITHOUT FEROCITY, AND ALL THE VIRTUES OF MAN WITHOUT HIS VICES. THIS PRAISE, WHICH WOULD BE UNMEANING FLATTERY IF INSCRIBED OVER HUMAN ASHES, IS BUT A JUST TRIBUTE TO THE MEMORY OF "BOATSWAIN," A DOG WHO WAS BORN AT NEWFOUNDLAND, MAY, 1803, AND DIED AT NEWSTEAD ABBEY NOV. 18, 1808...
Page 423 - Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion be your tutor: suit the action to the word, the word to the action; with this special observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature; for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end both at the first, and now, was and is, to hold, as 'twere, the mirror up to nature; to show virtue her own feature, scorn her own image, and the very age and body of the time his form and pressure.
Page 453 - It fastens the attention upon immortal necessary uncreated natures, that is, upon Ideas; and in their presence, we feel that the outward circumstance is a dream and a shade. Whilst we wait in this Olympus of gods, we think of nature as an appendix to the soul. We ascend into their region, and know that these are the thoughts of the Supreme Being.
Page 428 - The voice of a singer is not more strictly tied to time and tune than that of an actor in theatrical elocution. The least syllable too long, or too slightly dwelt upon in a period, depreciates it to nothing ; which very syllable, if rightly touched, shall, like the heightening stroke of light from a master's pencil, give life and spirit to the whole.
Page 354 - Prometheus," whom he was then about to paint. —Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy. There stood an unsold captive in the mart, A gray-haired and majestical old man, Chained to a pillar. It was almost night, And the last seller from his place had gone, And not a sound was heard but of a dog, Crunching beneath the stall a refuse bone, Or the dull echo from the pavement rung, As the faint captive changed his weary feet.
Page 333 - All the great men see what they paint before they paint it,— see it in a perfectly passive manner,— cannot help seeing it if they would; whether in their mind's eye, or in bodily fact, does not matter...
Page 333 - Therefore it is, that every system of teaching is false which holds forth "great art" as in any wise to be taught to students, or even to be aimed at by them. Great art is precisely that which never was, nor will be...
Page 260 - Three expressions are requisite, each presupposing and implying the other two. Each of the three terms must imply the other two. There must also be an absolute co-necessity between them. Thus, the three principles of our being, life, mind and soul, form a trinity. " Why ? " Because life and mind are one and the same soul ; soul and mind are one and the same life; life and soul are one and the same mind.
Page 453 - And no man touches these divine natures, without becoming, in some degree, himself divine. Like a new soul, they renew the body. We become physically nimble and lightsome ; we tread on air ; life is no longer irksome, and we think it will never be so. No man fears age or misfortune or death in their serene company, for he is transported out of the district of change. Whilst we behold unveiled the nature of Justice and Truth, we learn the difference between the absolute and the conditional or relative....

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