The Safeguard of the Sea: A Naval History of Britain, 660-1649

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W. W. Norton & Company, 1998 - History - 691 pages
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Throughout the chronicle of Britain's history, one factor above all others has determined the fate of kings, the security of trade, and the integrity of the realm. Without its navy, Britain would have been a weakling among the nations of Europe, could never have built or maintained the empire, and in all likelihood would have been overrun by the armies of Napoleon and Hitler. Now, for the first time in nearly a century, a prominent naval historian has undertaken a comprehensive account of the history and traditions of this most essential institution. N. A. M. Rodger has produced a superb work, combining scholarship with narrative, that demonstrates how the political and social history of Britain has been inextricably intertwined with the strength-or weakness-of her seapower. From the early military campaigns against the Vikings to the defeat of the great Spanish Armada in the reign of Elizabeth I, this volume touches on some of the most colorful characters in British history. It also provides fascinating details on naval construction, logistics, health, diet, and weaponry. "A splendid book. It combines impressively detailed research with breadth of perception....[Rodger] has prepared an admirable historical record that will be read and reread in the years ahead."—Times [London]
 

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Review: The Safeguard of the Sea: A Naval History of Britain 660-1649 (A Naval History of Britain #1)

User Review  - David - Goodreads

Exemplary, detailed history that busts myths, explains the unexplained and even cracks wise. Read full review

Review: The Safeguard of the Sea: A Naval History of Britain 660-1649 (A Naval History of Britain #1)

User Review  - John Knowles - Goodreads

Excellent. The rise of the Anglo-Saxon state driven (in part, presumably) by need to finance defences, including naval forces, to counter Scandinavian attacks; Scandinavians in turn build up state to create navy that can overwhelm the English defences. Read full review

Contents

The British Isles in the Dark Ages
1
The Viking Invasions
8
The First English Empires
18
The Partition of Britain
31
The Norman and Angevin Empires
37
The Irish Sea
40
The Mediterranean 4445
44
The Fall of the House of Anjou
50
The Spanish
238
The Caribbean 240241
239
The Method of Jason
272
The Path to Fame
297
Sailors for my Money
311
The Undertakings of a Maiden Queen
327
Iberia 252
340
No More Drakes
347

Western Brittany
52
West 5657
57
Ships of
61
The Northern Wars
73
The North Channel and Western Isles
76
The Bay of Biscay
81
The East Coast of Scotland
85
Edward III at
91
East 9495
94
Eastern Flanders and Zealand in the 13th and Hth Century
98
The Hundred Years War
100
Decline and Fall
109
The Chief Support of the Kingdom
117
Captains and Admirals
131
The West Country Western Channel
148
Precarious Isolation
176
The East Coast of England
180
The Thames Medway 224225
224
The North Atlantic 276277
349
Ireland 354355
354
The Inward Cause of All Disorders
364
A Diamond in his Crown
379
One and
395
The Fall of Three Kingdoms
411
Conclusion
427
Chronology
435
Ships
473
Medieval Fleets
490
Rates of Pay
498
Admirals and Officials
504
References
511
Glossary
589
Abbreviations
609
Index
663
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About the author (1998)

N. A. M. Rodger is professor of naval history at Exeter University and a fellow of the British Academy. He is the author of The Wooden World and the highly acclaimed volumes of his naval history of Britain, The Safeguard of the Sea and The Command of the Ocean. He lives in England.

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