Insect Biodiversity: Science and Society, Volume 2

Front Cover
Robert G. Foottit, Peter H. Adler
John Wiley & Sons, Apr 11, 2018 - Science - 1024 pages
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Volume Two of the new guide to the study of biodiversity in insects

Volume Two of Insect Biodiversity: Science and Society presents an entirely new, companion volume of a comprehensive resource for the most current research on the influence insects have on humankind and on our endangered environment. With contributions from leading researchers and scholars on the topic, the text explores relevant topics including biodiversity in different habitats and regions, taxonomic groups, and perspectives.

Volume Two offers coverage of insect biodiversity in regional settings, such as the Arctic and Asia, and in particular habitats including crops, caves, and islands. The authors also include information on historical, cultural, technical, and climatic perspectives of insect biodiversity.

This book explores the wide variety of insect species and their evolutionary relationships. Case studies offer assessments on how insect biodiversity can help meet the needs of a rapidly expanding human population, and examine the consequences that an increased loss of insect species will have on the world. This important text:

  • Offers the most up-to-date information on the important topic of insect biodiversity
  • Explores vital topics such as the impact on insect biodiversity through habitat loss and degradation and climate change
  • With its companion Volume I, presents current information on the biodiversity of all insect orders
  • Contains reviews of insect biodiversity in culture and art, in the fossil record, and in agricultural systems
  • Includes scientific approaches and methods for the study of insect biodiversity

The book offers scientists, academics, professionals, and students a guide for a better understanding of the biology and ecology of insects, highlighting the need to sustainably manage ecosystems in an ever-changing global environment.

 

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Contents

Cover
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Acknowledgments
Insect Biodiversity in the Arctic
Insect Biodiversity in Indochina A Window into
Acknowledgments
Biodiversity of Arthropods on Islands
Acknowledgments
Biodiversity of Blattodea the Cockroaches and Termites
Biodiversity of Mantodea
Biodiversity of Psocoptera
Biodiversity of Ectoparasites Lice Phthiraptera
References
Biodiversity of Thysanoptera
The Diversity of the True Hoppers Hemiptera

Beneficial Insects in Agriculture Enhancement
Acknowledgments
Insects in Caves
Biodiversity of the Thysanurans Microcoryphia
Biodiversity of Zoraptera and Their LittleKnown Biology
References
Biodiversity of Embiodea
Biodiversity of Orthoptera
Biodiversity of Phasmatodea
Biodiversity of Dermaptera
References
Biodiversity of Grylloblattodea and Mantophasmatodea
The Biodiversity of Sternorrhyncha
Biodiversity of the Neuropterida Insecta Neuroptera
Biodiversity of Strepsiptera
Biodiversity of Mecoptera
The Fossil History of Insect Diversity
Phenotypes in Insect Biodiversity Research
Global Change and Insect Biodiversity in Agroecosystems
Digital Photography and the Democratization
Bee Hymenoptera Apoidea Anthophila Diversity
Insect Biodiversity in Culture and
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About the author (2018)

ROBERT G. FOOTTIT is a research scientist specializing in the taxonomy of aphids and related groups, with the Canadian National Collection of Insects and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. His research interests include the use of morphological and molecular approaches in the study of aphid species and populations.

PETER H. ADLER is a professor of entomology at Clemson University, where he holds a teaching and research appointment, specializing in the behavior, ecology, genetics, and systematics of insects, particularly butterflies and medically important flies.

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