Genealogy of the Surname Yarker: With the Leyburn, and Several Allied Families, Resident in the Counties of Yorkshire, Durham, Westmoreland, and Lancashire, Including All of the Name in Cumberland, Canada, America, and Middlesex (from the Conquest to the Present Time)

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A.M. Petty, 1882 - 46 pages
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Page 1 - I, William, surnamed the Bastard, do give and grant to thee Alan, my nephew, Earl of Bretagne, and to thy heirs for ever, all the towns and lands, which lately belonged to Earl Edwin, in Yorkshire, with the knights fees, Churches, and other privileges and customs, in as free and honourable manner, as the said Edwin held them. Given from the siege before York.
Page 3 - William de Paston obtains a pardon as an adherent of the Earl of Lancaster for his participation in the death of Gaveston, and the disturbances occasioned thereby.
Page 44 - Clerk to Mr. Luke Yarker, Attorney-at-Law, of this place ; first for irreverent behaviour in church a second time, after public reproof on a former occasion of the same sort ; and, secondly, when mildly admonished by me not to repeat the same, they both made use of the most scandalous and insolent words concerning myself, for which I thought proper to pass a public censure upon them after sermon (though they were wilfully absent), in the face of the congregation ; and enter the mention of the same...
Page 1 - York, in the year 1069, and is couched in these brief but comprehensive terms: — I, WILLIAM, surnamed the Bastard, do give and grant to thee Alan, my nephew, Earl of Bretagne, and to thy heirs for ever, all the towns and lands which lately belonged to Earl Edwyn, in Yorkshire, with the Knight's fees, churches, and other privileges and customs, in as free and honourable a manner as the said Edwyn held them.
Page 16 - Quarterly, first and fourth quarterly, Argent and Gules, in the second and third a fret, Or ; over all, on a bend, Sable, three Escalops of the first ; for Spencer.
Page 36 - The tumulus ia supposed to constitute the barrow or tomb of Ella, King of the West Saxons. When Conyuger Hurst was rebuilt about ten years ago, a circular tomb was discovered when making the necessary excavations for the cellars, and a number of human bones together with an ancient sword was discovered, which crumbled to pieces soon after they were exposed to the air. The field adjoining Conynger Wood is still known by the name of Ella — Barrow.

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