Women Working in the Environment

Front Cover
Carolyn E. Sachs
Taylor & Francis, 1997 - Nature - 317 pages
Based on theoretical insights from ecofeminism, women and development, and postmodernism, and the convincing empirical work of numerous scholars, this book is organized around five aspects of gender relationships with the environment: Part I-gender divisions of labor, Part 2-property rights, Part 3-knowledge and strategies for sustainability, Part 4-environmental and social movements, and Part 5- policy alternatives. Examining women's relationship with the environment using these five dimensions provides concrete, material examples of how women work with, control, know, and affect the environment and natural resources.
 

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Contents

Part
13
Results
22
Epilogue
29
Theoretical Framework
35
Conclusion
46
Critiquing Gender
56
Epilogue
62
Family Life and Daily Activities
69
Women and Livestock in Rainfed and Irrigated Farming Areas
164
References
170
Gender Seeds and Biodiversity
177
Seed Saving in the United States
183
Conclusion
189
The Case Studies
196
Lessons for the Future
205
An Examination
215

Discussion
76
Part
83
Class Integration and Participation in Irrigated Tasks
92
Patriarchy Class
103
Conclusions and Implications for Development Policy
115
Epilogue
121
Women as Rice Sharecroppers in Madagascar
127
Gender Differences
133
Subsistence and the Single Woman Among
139
Discussion
149
Women and Livestock Fodder and Uncultivated Land
157
Results
223
Discussion and Conclusions
230
Womens Work Womens
241
Part Five
265
Restrictions on Decision Making Outside the Household
271
Summation
288
Two Samples of Female and Male USFS Natural Resource
294
Conclusions
301
Index
309
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