Historical Address at the Dedication of a Monument in Charlestown, N.H.

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T.R. Marvin & Son, 1870 - Charlestown (N.H.) - 28 pages
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Page 9 - Indian malice could invent was practiced to reduce the garrison," but without success. Says the captain's crisp report to Governor Shirley : " The wind being very high, and everything exceedingly dry, they set fire to all the old fences, and also to a log house about forty rods distant from the fort, to the windward, so that in a few minutes we were entirely surrounded by fire — all which was performed with the most hideous shouting from all quarters, which they continued in the most terrible manner...
Page 17 - Honor and shame from no condition rise ; Act well your part, there all the honor lies.
Page 17 - A sawmill was erected, and the first boards were sawed while I was there : the inhabitants commemorated the event with a dance, which took place on the new boards. In those days there was such a mixture on the frontiers, of savages and settlers, without established laws to govern them, that the state of society cannot be easily described, and the impending dangers of war, where it was known that the savages would join the enemies of our country, retarded the progress of refinement and cultivation....
Page 16 - When I approached the town of Charlestown, the first object that met my eyes was a party of Indians holding a war dance : a cask of rum^ which the inhabitants had suffered them to partake of, had raised their spirits to all the horrid yells and feats of distortion which characterize the nation. I was chilled at the sight, and passed tremblingly by. At this time Charlestown contained nine or ten families, who lived in huts not far distant from each other. The Indians were numerous, and associated...
Page 15 - ... destruction, and our distance from sources of information gave full latitude for exaggeration of news, before it reached our ears. The fears of the night were horrible beyond description, and even the light of day was far from dispelling painful anxiety... While looking from the windows of my log-house and seeing my neighbors tread cautiously by each hedge and hillock, lest some secreted savage might start forth to take their scalp, my fears would baffle description. Alarms grew louder and louder,...
Page 15 - Soon after his departure every body was "tremblingly alive" with fear. The Indians were reported to be on their march for our destruction ; and our distance from sources of information gave full latitude for exaggeration of news before it reached our ears. The fears of the night were horrible beyond description ; and even the light of day was far from dispelling painful anxiety. While looking from the windows of my...
Page 16 - Difficulty, and now by the Slough Despond. A few solitary inhabitants, who appeared the representatives of wretchedness, were scattered on the way. When I approached the town of Charlestown, the first object that met my eyes was a party of Indians holding a war dance : a cask of rum^ which the inhabitants had suffered them to partake of, had raised their spirits to all the horrid yells and feats of distortion which characterize the nation. I was chilled at the sight, and passed tremblingly by. At...
Page 15 - Malloon's family on Merrimack River. This reached us about the 20th of August. Imagination now saw and heard a thousand Indians ; and I never went round my own house without first looking with trembling caution by each corner to see if a tomahawk was not raised for my destruction.
Page 17 - ... settlers, without established laws to govern them, that the state of society cannot be easily described ; and the impending dangers of war, * where it was known that the savages would join the enemies of our country, retarded the progress of refinement and cultivation. The inhabitants of Charlestown began to erect a fort, and took some steps towards clearing their farms ; but war soon checked their industry. Charlestown. In the year 1740 the first settlement was made in the town of Charlestown,...
Page 17 - ... horrid yells and feats of distortion which characterize the nation. I was chilled at the sight, and passed tremblingly by. At this time Charlestown contained nine or ten families, who lived in huts not far distant from each other. The Indians were numerous, and associated in a friendly manner with the whites. It was the most northerly settlement on Connecticut River, and the adjacent country was terribly wild. A saw mill was erected, and the first boards were sawed while I was there.

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