Black's Guide to London and Its Environs

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Black, 1863 - London (England) - 390 pages
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Page 196 - Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft. Where be your gibes now? your gambols? your songs? your flashes of merriment, that were wont to set the table on a roar?
Page 94 - When I see kings lying by those who deposed them, when I consider rival wits placed side by side, or the holy men that divided the world with their contests and disputes, I reflect with sorrow and astonishment on the little competitions, factions, and debates of mankind.
Page 306 - My lord of Ely, when I was last in Holborn, I saw good strawberries in your garden there ; I do beseech you send for some of them.
Page 94 - When I read the several dates of the tombs, of* some that died yesterday, and some six hundred years ago, I consider that great day when we shall all of us be contemporaries, and make our appearance together.
Page 107 - Laud be to God ! — even there my life must end. It hath been prophesied to me many years, I should not die but in Jerusalem ; Which vainly I supposed the Holy Land. — But bear me to that chamber ; there I'll lie ; In that Jerusalem shall Harry die.
Page 98 - Chiefs, graced with scars, and prodigal of blood ; Stern patriots, who for sacred freedom stood ; Just men, by whom impartial laws were given ; And saints, who taught, and led, the way to heaven.
Page 258 - In emblematic figures, show The merits of their trade. That clients may infer from thence How just is their profession, The Lamb sets forth their Innocence, The Horse their Expedition. 0 happy Britons ! happy isle ! Let foreign nations say, Where you get justice without guile, And law without delay.
Page 261 - Thames' broad aged back do ride, Where now the studious lawyers have their bowers, There whylome wont the Templar Knights to bide, Till they decayed through pride...
Page 94 - When I look upon the tombs of the great, every emotion of envy dies in me ; when I read the epitaphs of the beautiful, every inordinate desire goes out; when I meet with the grief of parents upon a tombstone, my heart melts with compassion ; when I see the tomb of the parents themselves, I consider the vanity of grieving for those whom we must quickly follow.
Page 261 - I have been many a time in the chambers in the Temple which were his, and passed up the staircase, which Johnson, and Burke, and Reynolds trod to see their friend, their poet, their kind Goldsmith, — the stair on which the poor women sat weeping bitterly when they heard that the greatest and most generous of all men was dead within the black oak door.

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