Life in Dixie During the War, 1861-1862-1863-1864-1865

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Mercer University Press, 1892 - History - 442 pages
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<p>One of the few narratives of life in Atlanta during the Civil War. Mercer University Press proudly revives the paperback version of this acclaimed real-life account of what the fictional Scarlett O’Hara saw. <em>Life in Dixie During the War</em>, first published in 1892, ranks among the best first-person accounts of the American Civil War. Mary A. H. Gay eloquently recounts her wartime experiences in Georgia and bears witness to the “suffering and struggle, defeat and despair, triumph and hope that is human history.” Mary Gay was not only a chronicler, but an active participant in wartime activities; old veterans described her as “unusually brave and fearless.”</p> <p>While her book reads like a novel, it continues to be praised by modern scholars as an honest report of American history. James I. Robertson Jr. author of the acclaimed <em>Stonewall Jackson: The Man, The Soldier, The Legend</em> says: “Mary Gay’s<em>Life in Dixie During the War</em> is one of the few authentic personal narratives we have of life in Atlanta during the Civil War.” Sam Cunningham, the founding editor and publisher of Confederate Veteran, reported that “many books have been written on the subject of the Civil War, but we doubt if any of them are of deeper interest than Life in Dixie During the War.”</p> <p>In 1898, the Veteran published this review: “While possessing all the charms of romance, it is a recital of facts concerning the war, which occurred in the heart of the Confederacy. Written in the first person, it has unusual vividness of style. The author’s descriptions are truly remarkable. The reader seems to be living in those days and a witness to the scenes described. Historic facts are brought out regarding the siege of Atlanta which are perhaps found nowhere else. The author spared no pains in preparation of the work. Not the least of its merit is its pure English diction, with unsurpassed pathos in many of its pages. The heroism of men, the daring of boys, and the endurance of women are alike skillfully painted.”</p>
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTORY REMARKS
9
The Magnolia Cadets
17
Labors oi LoveMusicalDecatur
36
Labors of LoveKnitting and Sewing
42
The Third Maryland ArtillerySome
48
Coming Home from Camp ChaseThe
58
Some Social FeaturesMorgans
72
A Visit to DaltonThe Fidelity of an Old
94
The Return HomeFrom Jonesboro
193
On the Verge of StarvationA Wornout
207
CHAPTER XXLA Second Trip for SuppliesGathering
226
News from the Absent BrotherHe
243
An Incident of the WarRelated
251
The Decatur Womens Struggle
260
My Mothers DeathRev John
274
A Reminiscence
281

A Perilous Trust
104
Concealing Confederate ClothingValu
113
CHAPTER X1V The Advance Guard of the Yankee
124
The Battle of the 22d of July 1864The
135
Everetts Desertion
146
A Visit to Confederate LinesA Nar
156
The Ten Days ArmisticeGoing
168
How the Decatur Woman Kept
289
Postal AffairsThe Postmaster Hiram
298
The Death of Melville Clark
310
Hon Joseph E Browns Pikes
319
The Pursuit and Capture of
325
CONFEDERATE LOVE SONG
349
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