User-Centred Design of Systems

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Springer Science & Business Media, Jul 16, 1999 - Computers - 222 pages
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System design has conventionally been the province of engineers, and the approaches taken to the design of systems have conventionally led to formal specification of the system. The past decade or two has seen the rise of another approach, that of human-computer interaction (HCI). Given the number of incidents and accidents which are attributed to 'human error', it is sensible to develop an approach to system design which views humans as an essential element in the system. Thus, an important aspect of designing systems is the study of the interaction between humans and the technology that they use. In terms of bringing computers and computing to a wide audience, the 1980s were the boom years. The first personal computer (PC) was launched onto the market in February 1978, and since then, PCs have become a common-place feature of our homes, offices, schools, retail outlets, hospitals, banks, etc. Within Western society today, there are very few organisations that have not been infiltrated by computer technology, and few individuals who have not had experience of computers. However, the increase in use of computers has not been matched with a corresponding spread of training of users; much of the human-computer interaction research has sought to design systems which do not require special training, i. e. which people can simply walk up to and use. Not surprisingly, this has resulted in a number of difficulties; some of which have yet to be satisfactorily resolved.
 

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Page 197 - 87 375 - 380 Baber, C. and Stanton, NA (1991) Task analysis for error identification: towards a methodology for identifying human error In Ed.
Page 201 - The value of thinking-aloud protocols in industry: A case study at Microsoft Corporation. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors Society 34th Annual Meeting, Orlando, FL (Santa Monica, CA: The Human Factors Society), pp.
Page 208 - The Trouble with Computers: Usefulness, Usability and Productivity.

References to this book

User Design
Alison A. Carr-Chellman
No preview available - 2006
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About the author (1999)

Christopher Baber is a leading specialist in the field of human computer interaction. In his books Interactive Speech Technology: Human Factors Issues in the Application of Speech Input/Output to Computers and Beyond the Desktop: Designing and Using Interactive Devices, he explores the past work and the future of between humans and computers and technology. Computer Production of synthetic speech, computer recognition of human speech, and other aspects of this field are explored. Baber is a lecturer in industrial ergonomics at the School of Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering of the University of Birmingham, United Kingdom. He received his B.A. from Keele University and his Ph.D. from Aston University, both in the United Kingdom.