Tōn palaiōn, Thoukydidou, Platōnos, Lysiou, Xenophōntos, epitaphioi..

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Edward Bentham
Etei, 1768 - Funeral orations - 85 pages
 

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Page 15 - State hath risen, is an undeniable proof. For we are now the only people of the world who are found by experience to be greater than in report — the only people who, repelling the attacks of an invading enemy...
Page 15 - The person obliged is compelled to act the more insipid part, conscious that a return of kindness is merely a payment and not an obligation. And we alone are splendidly beneficent to others, not so much from interested motives, as for the credit of pure liberality.
Page 11 - And this our form, as committed not to the few, but to the whole body of the people, is called a democracy. How different...
Page 17 - ... to accomplish, thinking it more glorious to defend themselves and die in the attempt, than to yield and live. From the reproach of cowardice indeed they fled, but presented their bodies to the shock of battle ; when, insensible of fear, but triumphing in hope, in the doubtful charge they instantly dropped — and thus discharged the duty which brave men owe to their country.
Page 16 - ... manifest. We have great and signal proofs of this, which entitle us to the admiration of the present and future ages. We want no Homer to be the herald of our praise; no poet to deck off a history with the charms of verse, where the opinion of exploits must suffer by a strict relation. Every sea hath been opened by our fleets, and every land hath been penetrated by our armies, which have everywhere left behind them eternal monuments of our enmity and our friendship.
Page 19 - And sorrow flows not from the absence of those good things we have never yet experienced, but from the loss of those to which we have been accustomed. They who are not yet by age exempted from issue should be comforted in the hope of having more.
Page 17 - Yet not one of these was at all induced to shrink from danger, through fondness of those delights which the peaceful affluent life bestows, — not one was the less lavish of his life, through that flattering hope attendant upon want, that poverty at length might be exchanged for affluence.
Page 16 - And such compliments might be thought too high and exaggerated, if passed on any Grecians but them alone. The fatal period to which these gallant souls are now reduced is the surest evidence of their merit — an evidence begun in their lives and completed in their deaths. For it is a debt of justice to pay superior...
Page 16 - ... and the greatest part of which they have already received. For the encomiums with which I have celebrated the state, have been earned for it by the bravery of these, and of men like these. And such compliments might be thought too high and exaggerated, if passed on any Grecians but them alone.
Page 11 - We are happy in a form of government which cannot envy the laws of our neighbors, — for" it hath served as a model to others, but is original at Athens. And this our form, as committed not to the few, but to the whole body of the people, is called a democracy.

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