Power of Scandal: Semiotic and Pragmatic in Mass Media

Front Cover
University of Toronto Press, Jan 1, 2011 - Social Science - 407 pages
Are there events that are inherently scandalous? Power of Scandal finds that the very idea of 'scandal' is derived not from an event but from public opinion which, in turn, is constructed by media narratives. Scandal is powerful because of its ability to challenge institutions by destabilizing their legitimacy. The media play an integral role in the creation of scandal because they interpret real events as purposeful actions for the public. Examining the ubiquity of scandals in today's mass media, Johannes Ehrat comes to conclusions that are fresh and surprising.

Ehrat applies classic semiotic and pragmatic thought to contemporary media issues, from moralist discourse surrounding sex abuse cases to the phenomenon of televangelism. Arguing that sociological and communications studies of scandal have ignored its constructed nature, Ehrat focuses on how meaningful public narrative is produced. By examining the parallel worlds of media and public opinion, Power of Scandal uses an alternative heuristic for understanding mass communication that is both rigorous and sophisticated.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Ehrat_3133_076pdf
76
Ehrat_3133_103pdf
103
Ehrat_3133_180pdf
180
Ehrat_3133_215pdf
215
Ehrat_3133_257pdf
257
Ehrat_3133_291pdf
291
Ehrat_3133_323pdf
323
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

Johannes Ehrat is a professor extraordinarius in the Faculty of Social Sciences at the Pontificia Universita Gregoriana.

Bibliographic information