Aquinas Against the Averroists: On There Being Only One Intellect

Front Cover
Purdue University Press, 1993 - Philosophy - 222 pages
0 Reviews
In the mid-1260s in Paris, a dispute raged that concerned the relationship between faith and the Augustinian theological tradition on the one side and secular leaning as represented by the arrival in Latin of Aristotle and various Islamic and Jewish interpreters of Aristotle on the other. Masters of the arts faculty in Paris represented the latter tradition, indicated by the phrase double truth theory. The introduction places the work historically and sketches the controversy to which it was a contribution. Part 2 includes the Latin Leonine text and McInerny's translation. Part 3 analyzes the basic arguments of Thomas's work and provides a series of interpretive essays meant to make Thomas accessible to today's readers.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Aristotle
4
Paris 126972
6
Siger of Brabant
9
PART TWO
17
On There Being Only One Intellect Chapter
19
Chapter II
71
Chapter III
79
four Interpretive Essays
155
I In Pursuit of the Soul
164
I Defining the Soul
171
I Aristotles Analysis of Cognition
179
I Averroes or Aquinas?
188
I Is Soul Equivocal?
197
I This Human Being Understands
205
I DoubleTruth Theory
212

Chapter IV
103
Chapter V
121
Analysis
147

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1993)

Ralph McInerny was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota on February 24, 1929. He served in the Marine Corps in the late 1940s. He received a bachelor's degree from St. Paul Seminary in 1951, a master's degree from the University of Minnesota in 1952 and a doctorate in philosophy from Laval University in Quebec in 1954. He was a member of the University of Notre Dame faculty from 1955 until 2009. He gained international renown as a scholar, author and lecturer who specialized in the works of St. Thomas Aquinas. During his academic career, he was the Michael P. Grace Professor of Medieval Studies and director of the Jacques Maritain Center at the University of Notre Dame. He is founder and publisher of Catholic Dossier magazine and co-founder of Crisis magazine. His philosophical works include Aquinas on Human Action, The Question of Christian Ethics, and Aquinas and Analogy. His novels include the Father Dowling Mystery series, an Andrew Broom Mystery series, and the Sister Mary Teresa Mystery series. He also wrote under the pseudonyms of Harry Austin, Matthew FitzRalph, Ernan Mackey, Edward Mackin, and Monica Quill. He died on January 29, 2010 at the age of 80.