Scott's Orchardist: Or Catalogue of Fruits Cultivated at Merriott, Somerset

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H.M. Pollett, horticultural steam printer, 1873 - Fruit - 608 pages
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Page 573 - ... a fluid form, are not the soils which absorb most moisture from the atmosphere in dry weather; they cake and present only a small surface to the air, and the vegetation on them is generally burnt up almost as readily as on sands. The soils that are most efficient in supplying the plant with water by atmospheric absorption, are those in which there is a due mixture of sand...
Page 594 - Magnesia has a much weaker attraction for carbonic acid than lime, and will remain in the state of caustic or calcined magnesia for many months, though exposed to the air. And as long as any caustic lime remains, the magnesia cannot be combined with carbonic acid, for lime instantly attracts carbonic acid from magnesia.
Page 545 - ... all but the leading shoot of each side branch / this must be left on to exhaust the tree of its superabundant sap, till the end of August. The perpendicular leader must be topped once or twice ; in short, as soon as it has grown ten inches, pinch off its top, and if it break into two or three shoots, pinch them all but the leader, as directed for the first season ; in a few years most symmetrical trees may be formed.
Page 575 - Chalks are similar in one respect, that they are difficultly heated ; but being drier they retain their heat longer, less being consumed in causing the evaporation of their moisture. A black soil, containing much soft vegetable matter, is most heated by the sun and air ; and the coloured soils, and...
Page 594 - I have thrown carbonate of magnesia (procured by boiling the solution of magnesia in super-carbonate of potassa) upon grass, and upon growing wheat and barley, so as to render the surface white ; but the vegetation was not injured in the slightest degree. And one of the most fertile parts of Cornwall, the Lizard, is a district in which the soil contains mild magnesian earth. The Lizard Downs bear a short and green grass, which feeds sheep, producing excellent mutton ; and the cultivated parts are...
Page 575 - I found that a rich black mould, which contained nearly 4 of vegetable matter, had its temperature increased in an hour from 65 to 88 by exposure to sunshine ; whilst a chalk soil was heated only to 69 under the same circumstances. But the mould, removed into the shade, where the temperature was 62, lost, in half an hour, 15 ; whereas the chalk, under the same circumstances, had lost only 4.
Page 575 - A brown fertile soil and a cold barren clay were each artificially heated to 88, having been previously dried : they were then exposed in a temperature of 57 ; in half an hour the dark soil was found to have lost 9 of heat ; the clay had lost only 6. An equal portion of the clay containing moisture, after being heated to 88, was exposed in a temperature of 55 ; in less than a quarter of an hour, it was found to have gained the temperature of the room.
Page 575 - I have ascertained by experiment, that the darkest coloured dry soil (that which contains abundance of animal or vegetable matter; substances which most facilitate the diminution of temperature,) when heated to the same degree, provided it be within the common limits of the effect of solar heat, will cool more slowly than a wet pale soil, entirely coinposed of earthy matter. I found that a rich black mould, which contained nearly i of vegetable matter, had its temperature increased in an hour from...
Page 156 - Germany, are planted by the desire of the respective governments, not only for shading the traveller, but in order that the poor pedestrian may obtain refreshment on his journey. All persons are allowed to partake of the cherries, on condition of not injuring the trees...
Page 156 - ... for several days through almost one continuous avenue of cherry trees, from Strasburg by a circuitous route to Munich. These avenues, in Germany, are planted by the desire of the respective governments, not only for shading the traveller, but in order that the poor pedestrian may obtain refreshment on his journey.

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