Preparing for Citizenship: An Elementary Textbook in Civics

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Houghton Mifflin Company, 1922 - Citizenship - 238 pages
 

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Page iii - Each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and from time to time publish the same, excepting such parts as may in their judgment require secrecy, and the yeas and nays of the members of either house on any question shall, at the desire of one fifth of those present, be entered on the journal.
Page vi - State be obliged to enter, clear, or pay duties in another. 7. No money shall be drawn from the Treasury but in consequence of appropriations made by law ; and a regular statement and account of the receipts and expenditures of all public money shall be published from time to time. , 8. No title of nobility shall be granted by the United States ; and no person holding any office of profit or trust under them shall, without the consent of the Congress, accept of any present, emolument, office, or...
Page vii - Vice-President, declaring what officer shall then act as President, and such officer shall act accordingly until the disability be removed or a President shall be elected. 7. The President shall, at stated times, receive for his services a compensation which shall neither be increased nor...
Page vi - ... except what may be absolutely necessary for executing its inspection laws: and the net produce of all duties and imposts laid by any State on imports or exports, shall be for the use of the treasury of the United States; and all such laws shall be subject to the revision and control of the Congress.
Page viii - United States, whose appointments are not herein otherwise provided for and which shall be established by law ; but the Congress may by law vest the appointment of such inferior officers as they think proper in the President alone, in the courts of law, or in the heads of departments.
Page xi - All debts contracted and engagements entered into, before the adoption of this constitution, shall be as valid against the United States under this constitution as under the Confederation. 2. This constitution, and the laws of the United States which shall be made in pursuance thereof, and all treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be the supreme law of the land; and the judges in every State shall be bound thereby...
Page 236 - Lo, it is I, be not afraid! In many climes, without avail, Thou hast spent thy life for the Holy Grail; Behold, it is here, — this cup which thou Didst fill at the streamlet for me but now; This crust is my body broken for thee, This water His blood that died on the tree; The Holy Supper is kept, indeed, In whatso we share with another's need...
Page iv - States; 2 To borrow money on the credit of the United States; 3 To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian tribes; 4 To establish an uniform rule of naturalization, and uniform laws on the subject of bankruptcies throughout the United States...
Page xii - MASSACHUSETTS Nathaniel Gorham, Rufus "King. CONNECTICUT William Samuel Johnson, Roger Sherman. NEW YORK Alexander Hamilton. NEW JERSEY William Livingston, David Brearley, William Paterson, Jonathan Dayton. PENNSYLVANIA Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Mifflin, Robert Morris, George Clymer, Thomas Fitzsimons, Jared Ingersoll, James Wilson, Gouverneur Morris.
Page iii - The times, places, and manner of holding elections for senators and representatives, shall be prescribed in each state by the legislature thereof; but the congress may, at any time, by law, make or alter such regulations, except as to the places of choosing senators.

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