Modern Judaism: An Oxford Guide

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Nicholas Robert Michael De Lange, Miri Freud-Kandel
Oxford University Press, 2005 - Religion - 459 pages
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A comprehensive, multi-disciplinary, multi-authored guide to contemporary Jewish life and thought, focusing on social, cultural and historical aspects of Judaism alongside theological issues. This volume includes 38 newly-commissioned essays, including contributions from leading specialists in their fields. This book covers the major areas of thought in contemporary Jewish Studies, including considerations of religious differences, sociological, philosophical, and gender issues, geographical diversity, inter-faith relations, and the impact of the Shoah and the modern state of Israel.

Readership: Suitable for all undergraduate students studying Modern Judaism. Also for the general reader looking for a comprehensive guide to Modern Judaism.
 

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Contents

General introduction
1
1 Demographic issues
15
Historical issues
27
Issues of religion and modernity
79
Local issues
127
Social issues
191
Religious issues
229
Theological issues
265
Philosophical issues
301
Halakhic issues
339
Gender issues
375
Judaism and the other
413
Index
451
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About the author (2005)


Nicholas De Lange is Professor of Hebrew and Jewish Studies at the Faculty of Divinity at the University of Cambridge. He is also a Fellow of Wolfson College and Director of Studies for Gonville and Caius College. His research interests include medieval Hebrew literature and manuscripts, contemporary Jewish theology and Jewish-Christian relations. Following a Research Fellowship in the Faculty of Divinity at University of Cambridge, Miri Freud-Kandel moved to Oxford to take up a lectureship in Modern Judaism and a Junior Research Fellowship at Wolfson College. Her research interests include the theological development of Orthodox Judaism, particularly in Britain.

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