Romancero gitano: Poema del cante jondo

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Espasa-Calpe, 1978 - Flamenco - 220 pages

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Contents

PRÓLOGO de José Luis Cano
7
Romance de la luna luna
37
Preciosa y el aire
39
Reyerta
42
Romance sonámbulo
44
La monja gitana 1
51
Romance de la pena negra
55
San Miguel
58
Burla de don Pedro a caballo
91
Thamar y Amnón
95
BALADILLA DE LOS TRES RÍOS
103
POEMA DE LA SOLEÁ
115
POEMA DE LA SAETA
127
GRÁFICO DE LA PETENERA
139
DOS MUCHACHAS
149
LAMENTACIÓN DE LA MUERTE
157

San Rafael
61
San Gabriel
64
Prendimiento de Antoñito el Camborio en el camino de Sevilla
68
Muerte de Antoñito el Camborio
71
Muerto de amor
74
Romance del emplazado
77
Romance de la Guardia Civil Española
80
TRES ROMANCES HISTÓRICOS
87
TRES CIUDADES
163
SEIS CAPRICHOS
169
ESCENA DEL TENIENTE CORONEL DE LA GUARDIA CIVIL
175
DIÁLOGO DEL AMARGO
183
Reflejo final
201
Noche media Pueblo ceniza
207
Quejío
213
Copyright

About the author (1978)

Garcia Lorca is perhaps the best known of modern Spanish writers, partly because of his brutal execution outside Granada by Franco's army at the beginning of the civil war, but primarily because of his genius for poetry and drama. In 1928 Lorca published Gypsy Ballads, which won him immediate success and is considered one of the most important volumes of poetry of the century. Attracted to the gypsies for their exotic folklore, sexual vitality, and their status as a group on the fringe of Spanish society, Lorca enlarged the gypsy people and their traditions to mythical proportions. Nature takes on human form while reality acquires a dreamlike quality in this powerful transformation of the world into a myth. The verse is colorful, rhythmic, dramatic, symbolic, and suggestive. Lorca visited New York in 1929, experiencing a deep despair about a mechanical and dehumanized society; he saw in blacks the only hope for revitalization of that world. The volume Poet in New York (1929) shows the influence of Negro spirituals and the poets Walt Whitman and T. S. Eliot. Although Garcia Lorca was interested in drama throughout his life, he did not produce much of significance until the 1930s. Most important is his trilogy of Spanish rural life, Blood Wedding (1933), Yerma (1934), and The House of Bernarda Alba (1936), all tragedies with women as protagonists. In each play, the fall of the heroine, and of those around her whom she pulls down, is caused by frustrations produced by society. Blood Wedding demonstrates the sterility of the traditional code of honor. Yerma reveals the emptiness of a traditional marriage in which the woman must bear her husband children to prove her fidelity, and The House of Bernarda Alba dramatizes the destructive nature of Bernarda's dictatorial rule over her house, a microcosm of Spain. The Butterfly's Evil Spell (1919) is Lorca's first play; The Shoemaker's Prodigious Wife (1931) and Don Perlimplin (1931) are farces; The Billy-Club Puppets (1931) is a puppet play.

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