War's Unwomanly Face

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Progress Publishers, 1988 - Education - 247 pages
3 Reviews
"This book is a confession, a document and a record of people's memory. More than 200 women speak in it, describing how young girls, who dreamed of becoming brides, became soldiers in 1941. More than 500,000 Soviet women participated on a par with men in the Second World War, the most terrible war of the 20th century. Women not only rescued and bandaged the wounded but also fires a sniper's rifle, blew up bridges, went reconnoitering and killed... They killed the enemy who, with unprecedented cruelty, had attacked their land, their homes and their children. Soviet writer of Byelorussia, Svetlana Alexiyevich spent four years working on the book, visiting over 100 cities and towns, settlements and villages and recording the stories and reminiscences of women war veterans. The soviet press called the book 'a vivid reporting of events long past, which affected the destiny of the nation as a whole.' The most important thing about the book is not so much the front-line episodes as women's heart-rending experiences in the war. Through their testimony the past makes an impassioned appeal to the present, denouncing yesterday's and today's fascism..."--

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Review: War's Unwomanly Face

User Review  - Goodreads

This is by all accounts an excellent book, and one which captures the emotional struggle of Soviet women who served during the Second World War. Yet I have one strong reservation for readers ... Read full review

Review: War's Unwomanly Face

User Review  - Elizabeth - Goodreads

As heard on the NPR Books podcast: http://www.npr.org/2015/10/08/4468484... Read full review


You Must Grow Up a Little Girls You Are Too Young
I Alone Returned to My Mother

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