Critique of Exotica: Music, Politics and the Culture Industry

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Pluto Press, 2000 - Music - 261 pages
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In this innovative book, John Hutnyk questions the meaning of cultural hybridity. Using the growing popularity of Asian culture in the West as a case study, he looks at just who benefits from this intermingling of culture. Focusing on music, race and politics, Hutnyk offers a cogently theorised critique of the culture industry. He looks at artists such as Asian Dub Foundation, FunDaMental and Apache Indian to see how their music is both produced and received. He analyses ‘world’ music festivals, racist policing and the power of corporate pop stars to market exotica across the globe. Throughout, Hutnyk provides a searing critique of a world that sells exotica as race relations and visibility as redress.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
Adorno at Womad
19
DogTribe
50
Magical Mystical Tourism
87
Authenticity or Cultural Politics?
114
Critique of Postcolonial Marxisms
141
Naxalite
180
The Culture Industry
211
Bibliography
239
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

John Hutnyk is Senior Lecturer in Anthropology at Goldsmiths College, London. He is the author of The Rumour of Calcutta: Tourism, Charity and the Poverty of Representations (1996) and co-editor of Dis-Orienting Rhythms (1996).

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