Portrait and Biography of Parson Brownlow, the Tennessee Patriot: Together with His Last Editorial in the Knoxville Whig, Also, His Recent Speeches, Rehearsing His Experience with Secession, and His Prison Life

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Asher & Company, 1862 - Tennessee, East - 72 pages
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Page 12 - This issue of the Whig must necessarily be the last for some time to come — I am unable to say how long. The Confederate authorities have determined upon my arrest, and I am to be indicted before the Grand Jury of the Confederate Court, which commenced its session in Nashville on Monday last. I would have awaited the indictment and arrest before announcing the remarkable event to the world, but, as I only publish a weekly paper, my hurried removal to Nashville would deprive me of the privilege...
Page 15 - I repeat, I am proud of my position and of my principles, and shall leave them to my children as a legacy far more valuable than a princely fortune, had I the latter to bestow ! With me life has lost some of its energy: having passed six annual posts on the western slope of half a century, something of the fire of youth is exhausted; but I stand forth with the eloquence and energy of right to sustain and stimulate me in the maintenance of my principles. I am encouraged to firmness when I look back...
Page 68 - I cannot call it an honorable war —is written, it will be sadly deficient if its pages do not tell, in words that burn, the story of your wrongs, your fortitude, and your unswerving devotion to your country in the hour of her great trial. Our children will need no romance to stir their young hearts; but the truthful picture of your sufferings and heroism will fill the place of high-wrought fiction.
Page 12 - treasonable articles" on the first page of this issue, that the unbiased people of the country may "read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest" the treason. They relate to the culpable remissness of these Knoxville leaders in failing to volunteer in the cause of the Confederacy. According to the usages of the court, as heretofore established, I presume I could go free, by taking the oath these authorities are administering to other Union men; but my settled purpose is not to do any such thing. I can...
Page 13 - I have refused to make war upon the Government of the United States ; I have refused to publish to the world false and exaggerated accounts of the several engagements had between the contending armies ; I have refused to write out and publish false versions of the origin of this war, and of the breaking up of the best Government the world ever knew; and all this I will continue to do, if it cost me my life. Nay, when I agree to do such things, may a righteous God palsy my right arm, and may the earth...
Page 16 - They will bear me witness that 1 have held out as long as I am allowed to, and that I have yielded to a military despotism that I could not avert the horrors of, or successfully oppose. I will only say, in conclusion — for I am not allowed the privilege to write — that the people of this country are unaccustomed to such wrongs; they can yet scarcely realize them. They are astounded, for the time being, with...
Page 13 - State, or encouraged others to do so — I have discouraged rebellion publicly and privately — I have not assumed a hostile attitude toward the civil or military authorities of this new Government. But I have committed grave, and I really fear unpardonable offences. I have refused to make war upon the Government of the United States ; I have refused to publish to the world false and exaggerated accounts of the several engagements had between the contending armies ; I have refused to write out and...
Page 13 - I will render it null and void by refusing to sign it. In default of both, I expect to go to jail, and I am ready to start upon one moment's warning. Not only so, but there I am prepared to lie in solitary confinement until I waste away because of imprisonment or die from old age.
Page 13 - ... seeking to have me assassinated all summer and fall, as they desire me to do ; for this is really the import of the thing, and one of the leading objects sought to be attained. Although I could give a bond for my good behavior, for one hundred thousand dollars, signed by fifty as good men as the county affords, I shall obstinately refuse to do even that ; and if such a bond be drawn up and signed by others, I will render it null and void by refusing to sign it.
Page 14 - Knoxville, when their superiors in all the qualities that adorn human nature are in the penitentiary of our State! And this is the boasted liberty of the press in the Southern Confederacy ! I shall in no degree feel humbled by being cast into prison, whenever it is the will and pleasure of this august Government to put me there; but, on the contrary, I shall feel proud of my confinement. I shall go to jail—as John Rodgers went to the stake—for my principles.

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