Arboretum et fruticetum britannicum: or, The trees and shrubs of Britain, native and foreign, hardy and half-hardy, pictorially and botanically delineated, and scientifically and popularly described; with their propagation, culture, management, and uses in the arts, in useful and ornamental plantations, and in landscape gardening; preceded by a historical and geographical outline of the trees and shrubs of temperate climates throughout the world, Volume 1

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Printed for the author, 1838 - Botany
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Contents

Myginda Jacq
lix
Ehri Ua Roxb
lx
N America 552
lxii
1 Levant
lxvi
europaea L t Europe pi 1415 364
lxvii
Halfhardy Species of Cdustns 503
lxix
955
lxxi
piimila Michx
lxxii
The manyflowered Cytisus
lxxiii
Cufintu Tourn
lxxv
81
lxxx
Cephalanthus L
lxxxi
copallina L N Amer f 229 554
lxxxii
Htis idaea
lxxxiii
82
xc
The Synonymes are printed m Italics The letters pi refer to the portraits of entire trees and the letters
xcii
Id
xcv
Jemopanthes liaf
xcvi
107K
xcix
1186
cv
Psocerina L
cx
VOL III
cxii
Q r4cUi Pair
cxviii
coriaceiis Pursh A N America
cxxi
1690
cxxiii
sylvestris Scop Austria 580
cxxix
exxix 1949
cxxx
2152
cxxxvi
LcucopOon R
cxxxviii
chilnsis
cxli
unfperus L
cxlii
icix
cxliv
Prinos L
cxlvii
Vol VIII
cliv
Pistacia L
clxvii
Bigndnia Tourn c
clxxiv
1258
clxxxiii
Balurnodendron Kunth
clxxxvi
sp and 6 var
cxcii
purgans
cxcviii
Introduction
ccii
1261
ccvii
522
ccix
Stillingia Garden
ccxv
526
ccxx
tixyphina Ait a Sicily
ccxxii
pi 86
ccxxv
xxi
ccxxvii
xxxviii
ccxxviii
CLEMATIS L X L 232 Variety 236
1
f mollis i?e Jt Tauria 631
2
Uses of Trees I Ornaments 2 Interchange of Trees 3 Arrangement of
4
s macracantha Desf China
5
olelfera Abel I CochinChina
6
ADENOCARPUS Dec iJ 603
9
Albidus L a France
10
Chap L
15
ralviaefolius L n S Europe
16
scricea Wnlf
18
empetrifdlium WiHd n J S Europe
22
scaridsa Wn it Naples
24
t norida L Spain
30
Subsect 2 Of the Foreign Trees
35
vineale Pen Germany
42
caspica Desf J Caspian 655
55
John Clark a Butcher at Barnes famous Subsect 5 Of the Foreign Trees
57
hispanicus Dec a Spain 603
68
545
106
558
113
and Shrubs given in the Catalogue of the Commencement of the 19th Century
129
Chap III
132
and 18th Centuriesaccordingto Dr Walker of F A Michaux 142 of Dumont de Cour
142
Of the Indigenous and Foreign Trees and Shrubs of Ame
145
triangularis Wdtd Jt Hungary
155
Foreign Trees and Shrubs of 183 St Clair Lake Huron Lake Erie
161
Of the Trees and Shrubs America D J Brown
190
Study of Trees Pictorially
193
GYMNOCLADUSZam i 656
197
Beauty Architectural and Sculpturesque
200
Mode of drawing
203
Choice of Specimens 202 Details of the Pro
209
Chap II
211
Chap III
219
canadensis Lam Canada
225
Arboretum
231
Flammuk L x France fig 9 233 Variety 237 2 bracteata Dec X
233
glauca iViild j Siberia fig II 235 LongJlowered Virgins Bower
240
Viticella L A Spain fig 19
241
Dahoon Wall Carolina 519
243
alnina L 1 Austria fig 25
247
Pffioniacere
249
Xantborhiza L
255
493
256
MAGNOL1 L s J a
260
slauca Z 5 N America pi 3
266
o acuminata i I North America
273
canadensis i i Canada pi 101 659
276
964
277
purpurea Bot Mag a China
282
Expected Additions to the Order
291
Winterkcese R
292
triloba 7n ft N America f 39
293
BERBERIS L a
299
Ternstrdmikcese I1U 376
301
heterophlla Just S Am f 52
305
repens G Don b N Amer f 59
311
parviflorus Lam n Crete
319
hfbridus LHerit Hybrid
322
965
328
Halimium Dec a
329
microphylhim Swt n France
330
503
336
canum Dunal 1 S Europe
340
pilfjsa L Europe fig 279 586
345
SO rhodanthum Dunal t 1 Spain 348 95 cupreum Swt ft Hybrid
353
Other Species of Rhus 557
355
longiflora Lahill _uJ V D L f 79
357
Other ligneous Plants of the Order
363
microphylla
364
J idti Br I 6g371
371
The Malachodendron
377
559
385
A farnesiana TVUld i _J fiir
388
xli
391
THEA L iJ 381
392
967
395
Mahonia Nutt
396
A scyrea Chois
398
xlv
401
Other Species of Hypericum
403
variegatum Hurt 1
409
ii
415
barbatuxn Michx I North America
420
586
423
campestre L X Europe
428
xlvll
429
A ptlmfctnm TAm 3fc
460
flore plena
463
H rubicunda Lois t N America
467
pi 54
473
China pi 55
475
I
476
Chamlagu Lam China f 314 633
479
PRPNOSZ
480
Other hardy or halfhardy Species
481
gravcolens L n S Europe f 155
485
Hardy Species of Genista not yet
487
AILANTUS Desf X 487 490
491
sarmentosus Nutt N America
500

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Page 491 - There's fennel for you, and columbines; there's rue for you; and here's some for me; we may call it herb of grace o' Sundays. O, you must wear your rue with a difference. There's a daisy; I would give you some violets, but they withered all when my father died. They say he made a good end, — (sings) For bonny sweet Robin is all my joy.
Page ccxix - A LOVER'S DIARY. Fcap. Svo. 5j. A volume of poems. Parkes (AK). SMALL LESSONS ON GREAT TRUTHS. Fcap. Svo. is. 6d. Parkinson (John). PARADISI IN SOLE PARADISUS TERRESTRIS, OR A GARDEN OF ALL SORTS OF PLEASANT FLOWERS.
Page 304 - It is also remarkable for the irritability of its stamens, which, when the filament is touched on the inside with the point of a pin or any other hard instrument, bend forward towards the pistil, touch the stigma with the anther, remain curved for a short time, and then partially recover their erect position : this is best seen in warm dry weather. After heavy rain the phenomenon...
Page 429 - The brilliant white of the leaves beneath, forms a striking contrast with the bright green above, and the alternate reflection of the two surfaces in the water...
Page 432 - Trees offering this disposition are rare, and do not exist in the proportion of one to a hundred. The serpentine direction of the fibre, which renders them difficult to split and to work, produces, in the hands of a skilful mechanic, the most beautiful effects of light and shade. These effects are rendered more striking, if, after smoothing the surface of the wood with a double-ironed plane, it is rubbed with a little sulphuric acid, and afterwards anointed with linseed oil.
Page cxcviii - British topography : or an historical account of what has been done for illustrating the topographical antiquities of Great Britain and Ireland.
Page 419 - Some persons recommend leaving the syrup twelve hours before boiling it for the last time ; others proceed with it immediately. In either case the boilers are only half filled, and by an active, steady heat the liquor is rapidly reduced to the proper consistency for being poured into the moulds. The evaporation is known to have proceeded far enough when, upon rubbing a drop of the syrup between the fingers, it is perceived to be granular. If it is in danger of boiling over, a bit of lard or of butter...
Page 419 - The evaporation is kept up by a brisk fire, and the scum is carefully taken oft' during this part of the process. Fresh sap is added from time to time, and the heat is maintained till the liquid is reduced to a syrup, after which it is left to cool, and then strained through a blanket, or other woollen stuff, to separate the remaining impurities. " Some persons recommend leaving...
Page ccxxx - THE BOWMAN'S GLORY ; or archery revived. Giving an account of the many signal favours vouchsafed to archers and archery by those renowned monarchs, King Henry VIII., James, and Charles I. As by their several gracious commissions here recited may appear. With a brief relation of the manner of the archers marching on several days of solemnity. Published by William Wood, marshal to the Regiment of Archers.
Page 289 - They are six to eight inches broad, borne on long petioles, alternate, somewhat fleshy, smooth, and of a pleasing green colour. They are divided into three lobes, of which the middle one is horizontally notched at its summit; the two lower ones are rounded at the base.

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