Radical Atheism: Derrida and the Time of Life

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Stanford University Press, 2008 - Philosophy - 255 pages
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Radical Atheism presents a profound new reading of the influential French philosopher Jacques Derrida. Against the prevalent notion that there was an ethical or religious "turn" in Derrida's thinking, Hägglund argues that a radical atheism informs Derrida's work from beginning to end. Proceeding from Derrida's insight into the constitution of time, Hägglund demonstrates how Derrida rethinks the condition of identity, ethics, religion, and political emancipation in accordance with the logic of radical atheism. Hägglund challenges other major interpreters of Derrida's work and offers a compelling account of Derrida's thinking on life and death, good and evil, self and other. Furthermore, Hägglund does not only explicate Derrida's position but also develops his arguments, fortifies his logic, and pursues its implications. The result is a groundbreaking deconstruction of the perennial philosophical themes of time and desire as well as pressing contemporary issues of sovereignty and democracy.

 

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User Review  - Jannemangan - LibraryThing

"Radical Atheism is a masterful perfomance, and one cannot help but be convinced in the end. Hagglund carves out a way of reading and interpreting Derrida - all of Derrida, from early to late works ... Read full review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

On page 13, how does one "suspend democracy" when it's an idea?
How can anyone, using rationality, logic, or even the laws of physics be able to suspend and ideology that cannot be touched, felt, or
seen?
You should be saying "suspend democratic processes" or "suspension of democratic rights."
But to actually suspend an ideology, or an idea is just absurd.
 

Contents

III
13
IV
50
V
76
VI
107
VII
164
VIII
207
IX
237
X
249
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About the author (2008)

Martin Hägglund is a Charlotte W. Newcombe Fellow in Comparative Literature at Cornell University. He is the author of Chronophobia: Essays on Time and Finitude, which was published in Swedish in 2002. In Spring 2009, CR: The New Centennial Review will publish a special issue devoted to his work. Visit Martin Hagglund's website: www.martinhagglund.se

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