Faust

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Oxford University Press, 1998 - Fiction - 304 pages
7 Reviews
Loosely connected with Part One and the German legend of Faust, Part Two is a dramatic epic rather than a strictly constructed drama. It is conceived as an act of homage to classical Greek culture and inspired above all by the world of story-telling and myth at the heart of the Greektradition, as well as owing some of its material to the Arabian Nights tales. The restless and ruthless hero, advised by his cynical demon-companion Mephistopheles, visits classical Greece i search of the beautiful Helen of Troy. Returning to modern times, he seeks to crown his career by gaining control of the elements, and at his death is carried up into the unkown regions,still in pursuit of the `Eternal Feminine'. David Luke's translation of Part One won the European Poetry Translation Prize. Here he again imitates the varied verse-forms of the original, and provides a highly readable - and actable - translation, supported by an introduction, full notes, and an index of classical mythology.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - gbill - LibraryThing

Sequels are never as good as the originals. :-( It may be sacrilege to say it and the books were meant by Goethe to be read as a unified whole, but part two diverges way too far into classical ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - gbill - LibraryThing

Faust is Goethe’s masterpiece and the heart of his life’s work. He started thinking about it and writing it when he was bored with his studies at University and at the time he quickly cranked out “The ... Read full review

Contents

Preface
ix
A Study of the Lunar Symbolism
li
Chronology of Composition
lxxxii
FAUST PART TWO I
4
Selected Paralipomena
241
Explanatory Notes
251
Bibliography and Index of Names
286
Hertz Gottfried Wilhelm Zur Entstehungsgeschichte von Faust II Akt 5
293
Map of Greece Acts II and HI
306
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About the author (1998)

David Luke is also the translator of Faust, Part One (1987) in World's Classics.

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