The life and times of Daniel De Foe: with remarks digressive and discursive

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J. R. Smith, 1859 - 464 pages
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Page 15 - And it came to pass after these things, that one told Joseph, Behold, thy father is sick: and he took with him his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim. And one told Jacob, and said, Behold, thy son Joseph cometh unto thee: and Israel strengthened himself, and sat upon the bed.
Page 68 - I have often thought of it as one of the most barbarous customs in the world, considering us as a civilized and a Christian country, that we deny the advantages of learning to women. We reproach the sex every day with folly and impertinence, while I am confident, had they the advantages of education equal to us, they would be guilty of less than ourselves.
Page 14 - I came out; and when he is come, he findeth it empty, swept and garnished. Then goeth he, and taketh with himself seven other spirits more wicked than himself, and they enter in and dwell there...
Page 181 - The spirit of martyrdom is over; they that will go to church to be chosen sheriffs and mayors would go to forty churches rather than be hanged. If one severe law were made and punctually executed, that whoever was found at a conventicle should be banished th'e nation and the preacher be hanged, we should soon see an end of the tale. They would all come to church, and one age would make us all one again.
Page 166 - An Act declaring the Rights and Liberties of the Subject, and settling the Succession of the Crown.
Page 16 - For whosoever shall do the will of my Father which is in heaven, the same is my brother, and sister, and mother.
Page 426 - Majesty's opening speech had contained a " wish that effectual care had been taken, as I have often desired, to suppress those seditious papers and factious rumours by which designing men have been able to sink public credit, and the innocent have suffered. There are some who are arrived to that height of malice as to insinuate that the Protestant succession in the House of Hanover is in danger under my government!
Page 462 - I would say, (I hope) with comfort, that 'tis yet well. I am so near my journey's end, and am hastening to the place where the weary are at rest, and where the wicked cease to trouble; be it that the passage is rough, and the day stormy, by what way soever He please to bring me to the end of it, I desire to finish life with this temper of soul in all cases. Te Deum Laudamus.
Page 69 - ... capacities of women are supposed to be greater and their senses quicker than those of the men; and what they might be capable of being bred to is plain from some instances of female wit, which this age is not without; which upbraids us with injustice, and looks as if we denied women the advantages of education for fear they should vie with the men in their improvements.
Page 71 - If her temper be good, want of education makes her soft and easy. " Her wit, for want of teaching, makes her impertinent and talkative. Her knowledge, for want of judgment aud experience, makes her fanciful and whimsical. " If her temper be bad, want of breeding makes her worse, and she grows haughty, insolent, and loud.

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