Descriptions

Front Cover
Don Ihde, Hugh J. Silverman
SUNY Press, Jan 1, 1985 - Philosophy - 300 pages
Phenomenology in America has developed in unique directions with respect to descriptive analysis and in relation to interdisciplinary fields. Descriptions examines current trends in phenomenology. It begins by reflecting on phenomenological description itself, then takes phenomenology into such areas as time, science and the arts, the social, and into the universities.

Ranging from the development of theory by such well-known philosophers as Maurice Natanson and Robert Sokolowski, this collection addresses the topics of pregnant subjectivity, nostalgia, the ethical function of architecture, computer science, and academic freedom.
 

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Contents

1 Descriptive Phenomenology
2
2 The Theory of Phenomenological Description
14
3 Pregnant Subjectivity and the Limits of Existential Phenomenology
25
4 Keeping the Past in Mind
36
5 From Another Past
57
6 Distance Absence and Nostalgia
64
Experiencing the Elusive
76
8 The Sources of Experienced Temporal Features
91
12 Method and Madness in The Family Idiot
152
13 Natural and Artificial Intelligence
162
14 The Whole Business of Seeing
175
Theoretical Discovery of the PresentatHand
200
16 Phenomenology and Economic Science
211
17 Hannah Arendts Critical Appropriation of Heideggers Thought as Political Philosophy
222
18 Husserl on Reason and Justification in Ethics
246
Bildung in the Age of Technology
272

9 Toward a Phenomenological Aesthetics of Environment
112
10 The Ethical Function of Architecture
129
11 The Subject in Sartre and Elsewhere
141
21 Epistemology and Academic Freedom
284
Index
295
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About the author (1985)

Don Ihde is Professor of Philosophy at the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

Hugh J. Silverman is Professor of Philosophy and Comparative Literature at the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

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