On the We-a Trail: A Story of the Great Wilderness

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The Macmillan Company, 1903 - Frontier and pioneer life - 351 pages
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Page 166 - Ave, Maria, gratia plena; Dominus tecum: benedicta tu in mulieribus, et benedictus fructus ventris tui Jesus. Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.
Page 223 - And let me the canakin clink, clink; And let me the canakin clink A soldier's a man; A life's but a span; Why, then, let a soldier drink.
Page 320 - SIR : In order to save yourself from the impending storm that now threatens you, I order you immediately to surrender yourself, with all your garrison, stores, etc.; for if I am obliged to storm, you may depend on such treatment as is justly due to a murderer. Beware of destroying stores of any kind, or any papers or letters that are in your possession, or hurting one house in town — for, by heavens! if you do, there shall be no mercy shown you.
Page 250 - The army is in three hundred yd of the village. You must think how I feel; not four men that I can really depend on, but am determined to act brave. Think of my condition. I know...
Page 249 - I sent spies to find the certainty, the spies being taken prisoners, I never got intelligence till they got within 3 miles of the town, as I had called the militia...
Page 326 - I had no objections in giving him my real reasons, which were simply these: That I knew the greater part of the principal Indian partisans of Detroit were with him; that I wanted an excuse to put them to death, or otherwise treat them, as I thought proper; that the cries of the widows and the fatherless on the frontiers, which they had occasioned, now required their blood from my hands...
Page 320 - I am obliged to storm, you may depend on such treatment as is justly due to a murderer. Beware of destroying stores of any kind, or any papers or letters that are in your possession, or hurting one house in town. For by Heavens, if you do, there shall be no mercy shown you. GR CLARK."
Page 320 - Clark as soon as can be, and promises that whatever may pass between them two, and another person mutually agreed upon to be present, shall remain secret till matters be finished, as he wishes that, whatever the result of the conference may be, it may tend to the honor and credit of each party. If Colonel Clark makes a difficulty of coming into the fort, Lieutenant-Governor Hamilton will speak to him by the gate.
Page 325 - Hamilton that hostilities should not commence until five minutes after the drums gave the alarm. we took our leave, and parted but a few steps, when Hamilton stopped and politely asked me if I would be so kind as to give him my reasons for refusing the garrison on any other terms than those I had offered. I told him I had no objections in giving him my real reasons, which were simply these: that I knew the greater part of the principal Indian...
Page 323 - If such a step was taken, many, of course, would be cut down: and the result of an enraged body of woodsmen breaking in must be obvious to him. It would be out of the power of an American officer to save a single man.

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