Haeckel, His Life and Work

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T.F. Unwin, 1906 - Evolution - 336 pages
 

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Page 116 - Archipelago. Thirdly, the relation of the living edentata and rodentia to the extinct species. I shall -never forget my astonishment when I dug out a gigantic piece of armour like that of the living armadillo.
Page 242 - When the carriage drew up before Darwin's house, with its ivy and its shadowy elms, the great scientist stepped out of the shade of the creeper-covered porch to meet me. He had a tall and venerable appearance, with the broad shoulders of an Atlas that bore a world of thought : a Jove-like forehead, as we see in Goethe, with a lofty and broad vault, deeply furrowed by the plough of intellectual work. The tender and friendly eyes were overshadowed by the great roof of the prominent brows. The gentle...
Page 236 - Morphology" of 1866, which, as he told me, he prefers to his later works as an expression of his philosophy, concludes with the following passage: Our philosophy knows only one God, and this Almighty God dominates the whole of nature without exception. We see his activity in all phenomena without exception. The whole of the inorganic world is subject to him just as much as the organic. If a body falls fifteen feet in the first second in empty space, if three atoms of oxygen unite with one atom of...
Page 221 - ... frog develops from each of these eggs. But the object that develops from them is altogether different from the adult frog. This object is the familiar fish-like tadpole. It finally loses its tail, develops legs, and becomes a frog. Doctor Bolsche discusses the matter as follows : — " There are reasons on every hand for believing that the frogs and salamanders, which now stand higher in classification than the fishes, were developed from the fishes in earlier ages in the course of progressive...
Page 39 - the characterless or disorderly races, which we hardly dare ascribe to a species, as they lose themselves in infinite varieties", such as rubus, salix, verbascum, hieracium, rosa, cirsium, etc.
Page 236 - ... just as truly the direct action of God as the flowering of the plant, the movement of the animal, or the thought of man. We all exist " by the grace of God ", the stone as well as the water, the radiolarian as well as the pine, the gorilla as well as the Emperor of China. No other conception of God except this that sees his spirit and force in all natural phenomena is worthy of his all-enfolding greatness ; only when we trace all forces and all movements, all the forms and properties of matter,...
Page 223 - It is the same with the dog, the horse, the kangaroo, the 133 duck mole, the bird, the crocodile, the turtle, the lizard. They all have the same structure. " Nor is this an isolated fact. From the fish was evolved the amphibian. From this came the lizard. From the lizard came the bird. The lizard has solid teeth in its mouth. The bird has no teeth in its beak. That is to say, it has none to-day. But it had when it was a lizard. Here, then we have an intermediate stage between the fish and the bird....
Page 38 - Study the exceptions. They prove some other rule." The problem of the constancy or transmutation of species arrested me with a lively interest, when, twenty years ago, as a boy of twelve years, I made a resolute but fruitless effort to determine and distinguish the "good and bad species" of blackberries, willows, roses, and thistles. I look back now with fond satisfaction on the concern and painful skepticism that stirred my youthful spirits as I wavered and hesitated (in the manner of most "good...

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