Usher's Passing

Front Cover
Pocket Books, 1992 - Fiction - 416 pages
38 Reviews
The House of Usher is built on death itself - and now it has a new master...

For generations the House of Usher has grown wealthier and more powerful on the invention and sale of murderous military weapons. But another evil has lived and grown within the House of Usher - a legacy of depravity and bloodshed that goes back for generations, and stains the hallways of the family mansion.

One young heir, Rix Usher, is reluctant to return home. But the House of Usher has chosen "him" to take the reins from his dying father... to learn the house's terrible secrets. Joining in a ritual of fantastic evil, he will be forced to unleash the dreadful powers of Usher...

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Review: Usher's Passing

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In this sequel to Poe's “The Fall of the House of Usher”, McCammon proposes that not all of the Usher family died at the end of the story, that a brother lived on. And while the brother had the Usher ... Read full review

Review: Usher's Passing

User Review  - Goodreads

Got bored halfway through. Still a good book, though. Read full review


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About the author (1992)

Robert R. McCammon is a popular horror fiction writer. He was born in 1952 in Birmingham, Alabama and attended the University of Alabama. After college he spent a number of years working in advertising for bookstores in Birmingham, where he still lives. McCammon's first novel, "Baal," was published in 1978. He quickly joined the group of horror writers that includes Stephen King, Dean R. Koontz, and Anne Rice, who write suspenseful stories with modern-day settings. He has published over two dozen books to date. With the publication of "Boy's Life" in 1991, McCammon left behind the horror genre, noting that he finds real life horrifying enough these days. While there are some aspects of the supernatural in "Boy's Life," it is more a story of growing up in a small Southern town.

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