Bastards and Foundlings: Illegitimacy in Eighteenth-century England

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Ohio State University Press, 2005 - History - 228 pages
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By recreating the context of the national preoccupation with bastardy, with a special emphasis on the gender of the fictional bastard/foundling, Zunshine offers new readings of "canonical" texts, such as Steele's The Conscious Lovers, Defoe's Moll Flanders, Fielding's Tom Jones, Moore's The Foundling, Colman's The English Merchant, Richardson's Clarissa and Sir Charles Grandison, Burney's Evelina, Smith's Emmeline, Edgeworth's Belinda, and Austen's Emma, as well as of less well-known works, such as Haywood's The Fortunate Foundlings, Shebbeare's The Marriage Act, Bennett's The Beggar Girl and Her Benefactors, and Robinson's The Natural Daughter."--BOOK JACKET.
 

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Contents

Cultural Narratives of Illegitimacy
1
Bastard Daughters and Founding Heroines Rewriting Illegitimacy in The Conscious Lovers
23
Moll Flanders and the English Shelter for Bastards
40
Kicking Out the Cubs The Wrong Heirs in Richardsons Clarissa
64
Tom Jones Resisting the Mythologization of Bastardy
86
Female Philanthropy the London Foundling Hospital and Richardsons The History of Sir Charles Grandison
101
The Children Owned By None Divided Bastardy in Frances Burneys Evelina
127
Harriet Smith in Brunswick Square Common Sense Bastardy in Austens Emma
152
BBC Rewrites Tom Jones Illegitimacy
169
Notes
173
Bibliography
200
Index
219
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Lisa Zunshine is assistant professor of English, University of Kentucky, Lexington

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